Microsoft Support: Console (CMD) Fonts

Update: You can use the following registry script to automate this process – just copy/paste the code block below into a text file called “Add Consolas to CMD.reg” and run it:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont]
"0"="Lucida Console"
"00"="Consolas"
RegEdit -  Console Fonts
RegEdit - Console Fonts

If you’d like to use an alternative console font for CMD.exe in Windows, check out the scoop from Microsoft Support on how to set it up…

The fonts must meet the following criteria to be available in a command session window:

  • The font must be a fixed-pitch font.
  • The font cannot be an italic font.
  • The font cannot have a negative A or C space.
  • If it is a TrueType font, it must be FF_MODERN.
  • If it is not a TrueType font, it must be OEM_CHARSET.

Additional criteria for Asian installations:

  • If it is not a TrueType font, the face name must be “Terminal.”
  • If it is an Asian TrueType font, it must also be an Asian character set.

In Windows 2000, the installation of Console Fonts is no longer automated. This was done to give the console window greater stability in multilanguage environments. An unsupported work around is available by adding the following font specific entry:

Add a String Value
Name=00
Data= “Font Name” (without “”)

Into the following registry:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont

The name needs to be incrimented with “0” for each additional font. The Data entry needs to match the font’s entry in the following registry location:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Fonts

via Necessary criteria for fonts to be available in a command window.

And, if you’re itching to find a nice replacement for Courier New or Lucida Console:

  • Consolas:
    If you have Windows Vista or windows 7, this is already installed, otherwise you’ll need to download the PowerPoint Viewer 2007 from Microsoft to get the font legally. (As an added bonus, the rest of the Windows Vista fonts come with it – see here for details: Download Windows Vista Fonts from Microsoft Office Website)
  • DejaVu Sans Mono:
    This font comes pre-installed with many current Linux distributions and is released under a free license, which makes this font arguably the best of the bunch. Find it here: http://dejavu-fonts.org/wiki/index.php?title=Download
  • Droid Sans Mono:
    Straight from the Android SDK comes the Droid Sans Mono font, which is quite similar to the DejaVu Sans Mono font listed above. You can grab this from the Android SDK download, or you can get it directly from the damieng blog here: Droid Sans Mono great coding font

Prevent Startup Programs from Running Twice in Windows XP

Finally! This problem was bugging me for so long – I just now thought to research it and found this article. Very helpful!

Prevent Startup Programs from Running Twice in Windows XP

A way to solve the problem of programs in the Startup folder being executed twice on Windows XP logon. The applications may appear doubled in msconfig.

Problem

Under Windows XP, programs placed in the Start MenuProgramsStartup folder may be running twice. This occurs even though only one shortcut or icon for each program appears in the Startup folder when viewed through Windows Explorer. When you use msconfig (Startup tab) or autoruns (Logon tab) to inspect the Startup listings, they appear twice. Unchecking one or both disables the program from running at all.

Cause

This situation can occur if the user-specific Startup folder is deleted from the user’s profile. When that happens, Windows looks for user-specific startup programs in the All Users startup folder instead. This causes doubling, because the programs from the All Users startup folder are executed once for All Users and again for the current user.

via Prevent Startup Programs from Running Twice in Windows XP.

Run Windows Apps 100% Seamlessly on Ubuntu

Very cool!

I know that most of us Linux [users] usually cringe whenever we need to *god forbid* use a Microsoft WIndows machine. So we created applications like Wine in an effort minimize the contact with that horrid machine. With Wine a big percentage of Windows only apps could run on Linux, which more or less takes Windows out of the equation and lets us interact directly with our favorite App. Another solution of course would be installing Windows on a virtual machine.

But running an app on a virtual machine doesn’t eliminate Windows from the equation. Right? So I will show you now how to run Windows apps 100% seamlessly on Ubuntu.

(via Royal Linuxing!)

Linux Console fonts for Windows

Pretty cool!

Linux console fonts for Windows

These are fixed-width fonts converted to TTF and FON format from the original X11 sources. You will recognize them as the default xterm fonts; they are widely used. They are especially useful for console apps. We programmers can’t live without them

The main problem you’ll encounter is that, some of them being FON files, they are not usable in all Windows programs. This has been a big issue for a long time but recently I added some Windows TTF format that work really well. They even work in Macintosh

via Linux Console fonts for Windows in TTF and FON.

Super Awesome Firefox 3 Tips! (All Platforms)

Just a little collection of tips and tricks I’ve compiled from my browsing about the interwebs. Hopefully they’ll be as useful to you as they were to me! 🙂

(And here’s more tips for Firefox 3 on Linux: Super Awesome Firefox 3 Tips! (Linux))

Disable Installation Delay of Extensions

  1. Open Firefox.
  2. In the Location Bar, input about:config.
  3. Click to get past the warning message that appears.
  4. Locate the Preference Name security.dialog_enable_delay.
  5. Double-click the preference and change the value to 0.

Force old Firefox Extensions to work in Minefield or Nightly-Trunk

  1. Open Firefox
  2. In the Location Bar, input about:config.
  3. Click to get past the warning message that appears.
  4. Right-click on any of the values and select New > Boolean
  5. Add the value extensions.checkCompatibility and set it to False.
  6. Right-click on any of the values and select New > Boolean
  7. Add the value extensions.checkUpdateSecurity and set it to False.
  8. You should now be able to use your extensions from Firefox 3.x in Minefield.

Shrink Firefox 3’s Supersized Back Button

If you’re not a fan of Firefox 3’s large back button, you don’t have to wrangle with CSS or themes to adjust its size. Simply right-click on Firefox’s toolbar, and choose Customize. In the dialog box, select “Use small icons”—and voila! Your back button will be the same size as reload.

(You can also “revert” to a retro Firefox theme here – https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/7645)

Firefox Minefield: Faster Than Chrome

  1. Download and install the latest nightly build.
  2. Start tracemonkey javascript engine by going to about:config and enabling the option javascript.options.jit.content. (Set it to True.)
  3. Browse websites blazingly fast!

According to some tests it is 10% faster than Google Chrome.

…Stay tuned, more tips to come!

Dock Icons Galore!

I’ve been using RocketDock for quite some time, and I’m always on the hunt for great looking dock icons compatible with it (Or MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher, Y’z Dock, etc.). Luckily, I’ve stumbled across some pretty sweet picks lately and thought I’d share. 🙂

folders

Refresh_CL_Icon_Pack_by_TPDKCasimir

Sleek_XP__Software_by_deleket

You can find a whole bunch more great icons at the following links:

Instant Eyedropper

This little tool is awesome. It’s like the eyedropper in Photoshop, except that it works on any pixel of your screen and gives you the hex code for the color in your clipboard. Very cool!

How it works

  1. Move the mouse pointer to the Instant Eyedropper icon in the system tray.

    Step One

  2. Press and hold the left mouse button and move the mouse pointer to the pixel whose color you want to identify.

    Step One

  3. Release the mouse button.

That’s it. The clipboard now contains the color code – in HTML format (or any other format that you have previously specified). It can be pasted and used in any text or HTML editor or the Color Picker tool of Photoshop.

(http://instant-eyedropper.com/)