KB971092 won’t install (Visual Studio 2008 Security Fix)

From Microsoft Connect:
(https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/ViewFeedback.aspx?FeedbackID=478117)

Until Microsoft come up with an official solution there is a working workaround for this problem.

This problem only appears to affect people who have not got Visual C++ Installed.

1.) Download VS90SP1-KB971092-x86.exe from here …
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=294de390-3c94-49fb-a014-9a38580e64cb
2.) Start the installation VS90SP1-KB971092-x86.exe
3.) Wait for the error message to come up – DO NOT CLOSE THE WINDOW!
4.) Copy the temp. folder where the patch has been unpacked to a new folder, for example onto your desktop.
5.) Close VS90SP1-KB971092-x86.exe that you started in 2.)
6.) Navigate to <drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\Tools and find vsvars32.bat.
7.) Change the permissions on the file to allow everyone to edit it.
8.) Start VS90SP1-KB971092-x86.msp from within the saved folder and the process should complete.

the hamstu » The Typography of Code

fixed_prop.png

Cool post with a lot of great history and font samples!

As a self proclaimed programmer/designer I enjoy not only the logical and practical things in life, but also the beautiful and well designed. And I find the greatest pleasure when these things converge to produce something extraordinary.One such thing is Typography. Typography is the art of language, the visualization of the spoken word. A medium by which non-verbal communication is made possible. And though I profess no expertise in this art, I have come to deeply appreciate it’s power and ability to convey the same message in so many different ways. Each with a unique feeling and style.

The Messenger

In 1956 Howard Kettler designed the typeface Courier. It was made for IBM’s new (and revolutionary) line of electric typewriters. Originally called “Messenger”, Courier is one of the earliest fixed-pitch (also known as Monospace) fonts, meaning each character takes up the same amount of space on a line; allowing for easy tabular alignment and legibility.

Courier was a hit, and as many made the transition from typewriter to computer, this classic typeface wasn’t far behind. It was included in all early Apple computers, and while creating the core fonts for Windows 3.1, Microsoft hired Monotype Typography to give Courier a makeover. And so Courier New was born, as a thinner and cleaner version of it’s former self.

via the hamstu » The Typography of Code.

#region: Awesome or Horrible?

While coding in Java recently, I decided to do a little research to see if Java supported the #region directive (or something similar) and found a ton of articles knocking its usage as poor programming style.

Personally, I love the #region directive in C#, as it allows me to keep my code more organized (and yes, I am aware of the exisiting code-folding functionality in Visual Studio). In the files I work with, I’ve become pretty meticulous about organizing the code blocks into regions, partially because I like the organization, and partly because I was previously under the impression that it was good form to keep source files organized in this way. I use the following regions myself, generally:

  • Private/Protected Members
  • Public Accessors
  • Constructors
  • Public Methods
  • Protected Methods
  • Private Methods
  • (Anything class specific)

I agree with the sentiment in the articles I’ve read that it is *not* good practice to sweep bad code under the rug by hiding it from the developer in a folded #region, but I think that organizing relatively good code into regions like the ones I’ve mentioned above makes it a lot easier to get directly to the code I want to work on.

What do you think? I’m curious to see justifications for/against this directive, and as always, thanks for reading!

Additional links:

Speed up Visual Studio – EPiServer Labs

Great tips on how to speed up Visual Studio 2008! Combine this with the hotfix and SP1, and…it’s almost as fast as Visual Studio 2005. 😉

  1. Turn off validation
  2. Turn off the Navigation Bar
  3. Show Live Semantic Errors
  4. Track changes
  5. Animate environment tools
  6. Compile for the correct platform
  7. Speed up debugging by removing breakpoints
  8. Formatting XML for easy diff

Find out all the details at the original post: Speed up Visual Studio – EPiServer Labs.

Visual Studio 2008 SP1

2008-08-25_104903

I’ve seen a *lot* of hits on my post “Visual Studio 2008 Is Pretty Damn Slow…“, which means that a lot of you are probably still experiencing speed issues with Visual Studio 2008. In regard to this, I thought it might be prudent to post information about the recently released Service Pack 1 for VS2008 and where to find it:

aa700831.VS08_v(en-us,MSDN.10)

Visual Studio 2008 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 Downloads

Visual Studio 2008 SP1 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 significantly improve the developer experience during the development process, and at runtime. These improvements address top issues reported by customers. For more information, see Visual Studio 2008 SP1 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1.

Downloads

Additionally, the original hotfix which was intended to fix the speed issue (and is probably integrated into VS2008SP1) is available here:

And…

Here are all my posts related to this Visual Studio 2008:

Linkback: "Visual Studio 2008 C# IDE is Slow … Really slow."

Here’s a MSDN forum article that links back to my post about the VS2008 hotfix:

I believe there are known issues with VS2008 and web development.  This article contains a link to some hotfixes for VS2008 web development.  Maybe it’ll fix your problem: https://blog.wolffmyren.com/2008/02/11/performance-and-editor-fixes-for-vs2008/

(via forums.microsoft.com/MSDN)

Multi-Targeting VS2005 and VS2008 Web Application Projects, a Gotcha!

Great post on how to share a solution between VS2008 and VS2005, from stevenharman.net/blog:

One of the things I’m most excited about with Visual Studio 2008 is it’s ability to target various versions of the .net framework, a feature known as multi-targeting.

I recently rebuilt a (hand-me-down) laptop for use at developer group meetings, conferences, and coding from the couch. When building out the machine I decided to only install VS2008 and make use of multi-targeting to work on my various .net 2.0 projects… like Subtext. Today I finally got around to loading Subtext up in VS2008 and I was expecting some heartache.

But I did a little research first and luckily came across Rick’s great post explaining how VS2008 and VS2005 can be made to play nice together, allowing you to work with your projects in either IDE. The gist is, the project files (i.e.- your .csproj files) will work in either environment, but you’ll need to maintain separate solution files. Not a huge deal as most of the churn is usually in the individual project files, and not the solution.

(via Multi-Targeting VS2005 and VS2008 Web Application Projects, a Gotcha!)

Performance and Editor fixes for VS2008…

KB946581 Install

In regard to my previous post, Visual Studio 2008 Is Pretty Damn Slow, a couple engineers from Microsoft have contacted me to let me know that a hotfix has been made public which should address the performance issues I mentioned in that previous post.

The blog entry regarding this hotfix can be found here:
Downloadable Hotfix: Performance and Editor fixes for Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 and Visual Web Developer Express 2008

More info from Scott Guthrie’s Blog:
VS 2008 Web Development Hot-Fix Roll-Up Available

More info from Rick Stahl’s Blog:
Visual Studio Hotfix for Slow Web Forms Editing and Input Focus Issues

And the hotfix itself, here:
Connect.Microsoft.Com (DownloadID=10826)

Quote from the MSDN blog linked above (Downloadable Hotfix…):

Continue reading “Performance and Editor fixes for VS2008…”