Virtual PC VHD to Bootable VHD How-To

I’ve been trying to put together a bootable VHD within Virtual PC for a couple weeks now, and while I’ve gotten the VM configured to my liking, I’ve been missing the step to convert that VM’s VHD into a generalized, bootable image.

Finally, I’ve found the answer I’ve been looking for:

Continue reading “Virtual PC VHD to Bootable VHD How-To”

VMware Tools Don’t Work in Ubuntu 8.10

Found these two links to information about VMware Tools not working with Ubuntu 8.10. I’ve been looking for a solution to this myself since testing with Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 5…

From the FAQ:

Tools compile cleanly on 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) but do not work

There are several aspects to this – soft ungrab not working, mouse clicks being displaced, vmware-user not starting (and so Unity and other dependent features don’t work).

Explanation

Soft ungrab not working and mouse clicks being displaced are known Ubuntu vmmouse bugs. An update is not yet available.

vmware-user not starting appears to be related to Intrepid’s autostart format having changed. A workaround is to go to System > Preferences > Sessions in the Ubuntu desktop menu and add /usr/bin/vmware-user as a startup command.

open-vm-tools may also work.

VirtualBox: Free Virtualization Software

800px-VirtualBox

I’ve been using VMware Player for quite some time, and it’s quite good, but recently, I stumbled upon another free virtualization tool which also allows you to create new VM images (VMware Player only plays back VMware images created with a purchased version, such as VMware Workstation, or through a website such as EasyVMX: http://www.easyvmx.com/)

According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VirtualBox):

VirtualBox is an x86 virtualization software package originally created by German software company Innotek and now being developed by Sun Microsystems as part of its Sun xVM virtualization platform. It is installed on an existing host operating system; within this application, additional operating systems, each known as a Guest OS, can be loaded and run, each with its own virtual environment. For example, Linux can be guest hosted on a single virtual machine running Microsoft Windows XP as the Host OS; or, XP and Windows Vista can run as guest OSes on a machine running OpenSolaris.

Supported host operating systems include Linux, Mac OS X, OS/2 Warp, Windows, and Solaris, while supported guest operating systems include FreeBSD, Linux, OpenBSD, OS/2 Warp, Windows and Solaris.[1]

According to a 2007 survey by DesktopLinux.com, VirtualBox is the third most popular software package for running Windows programs on Linux desktops.[2]

So far, so good, with the exception of a little glitch I experienced while installing FreeDOS. Ubuntu runs quite well, and quite fast, as far as I can tell.

A particularly cool element of VirtualBox is the “Seamless Desktop” mode, similar to what is found in Parallels or VMware Fusion on the Macintosh:

750px-Virtualbox15seamless

Considering the level of functionality given for free, which is quite similar to the functionality you’d have to pay for in VMware or Parallels, I’m tempted to stick with VirtualBox for the near future and put it through its paces.

If you’re curious about VirtualBox yourself, you can find a copy here:

http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

and more directly, here:

Sun xVM VirtualBox 1.6 Download

Update:

Here are some links to download pre-made VirtualBox images:

http://virtualbox.wordpress.com/

http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=213555