MiniBin!

Update!

e-Sushi has posted a new version of MiniBin after all! You can find the new version at e-Sushi.net (http://www.e-sushi.net/minibin), or you can still download the old version (3.8.3.0) below.

One of my favorite Windows utilities, MiniBin, has just been retired by its developer, so I’m creating a post here to make the download available after its binaries get pulled from the original website.

MiniBin-3.8.3.0-Setup.zip

(Thanks to Mike Edward Moras for making such a great app!)

Details from e-sushi.net:

MiniBin is a free recycle bin for your Microsoft Windows system tray area; the area next to the clock in your taskbar.

Please note that the MiniBin project has ended. This means: no more updates and no more support. Yes, I know… but it had to end somewhere. MiniBin was first published in 2004 and enjoyed updates until 2012. As it’s bug-free and feature-complete in it’s current state, I decided it’s time to move on to new horizons.

For the time being, you can still download the final version of MiniBin, the recycle bin for your system. But this download will vanish into the void within the not so far future. So, get it while it’s still available!

Clipdiary: Clipboard Manager

I previously recommended PhraseExpress for similar clipboard management functionality, but I’ve since switched to Clipdiary (available free via Clipdiary.com or Download.com) for a couple of reasons – first, that PhraseExpress would randomly lock up and prevent me from using my Enter key (weird, huh?), and second, because ClipDiary is super lightweight and does exactly what I want it to do. Here’s a blurb from their website:


The contents of the standard Windows clipboard change as you use it to copy and paste various types of information. But your data isn’t stored for a long time – when you turn off the computer or just copy another piece of information, the data is lost.

In most cases, that isn’t a problem, but have you ever needed the text you copied 30 minutes or an hour ago? Maybe your computer is acting up and the program you are using hasn’t saved the data, or maybe you copied some interesting information from a web page, but got distracted and forgot to paste it where you wanted? Or you may simply want to recall what you were doing on your computer a month or a year ago. There are many cases in which you might want to review your clipboard contents.

via Clipdiary is a clipboard manager for keeping the clipboard history.

The White Balance Lens Cap at The Photojojo Store

This is awesome. I’m definitely going to pick one of these up as soon as I can. I just need to figure out which diameter I want. (My lenses are 72mm, 58mm, and 52mm.)

You may think automatic white balance is good enough. But if you’ve ever had to fix dozens (or even 100s) of photos with just slightly different colors, one-by-one, you know the true meaning of pain.

The White Balance Lens Cap leaves you no excuse for not properly white-balancing every situation you encounter.

Simply flip your camera into custom White Balance mode, snap a photo with your White Balance Lens Cap on, and your camera creates a perfect profile of the actual lighting in front of you.

Best of all, unlike a gray card, the White Balance Cap takes no extra room in your gear bag. Just replace your existing lens cap with this one and you’ll always be able to white balance with no additional equipment.

Squeeze the White Balance Lens Cap’s side tabs for easy attachment or removal, even with a lens hood in place. The center pinch-release mechanism prevents it from accidentally being bumped off, while in your bag or shooting in a crowd.

Each White Balance Lens Cap comes with both a neutral and a warm color dome. Pick whichever you prefer and give all your photos perfectly consistent white balance.

Available for lens thread sizes 52mm, 55mm, 58mm, 62mm, 67mm, 72mm and 77mm. (Don’t know your thread size? Just check the outer rim or bottom of your lens for one of these numbers.)

Note: You may look a little silly setting your white balance by taking a photo with your lens cap still on, but the results are worth it. We promise.

via The White Balance Lens Cap at The Photojojo Store.

Copy/Move Files Faster In Windows Vista

I found these programs on the interwebs last week and thought they might be useful; the first, TeraCopy, significantly sped up my file transfer speed in Windows Vista and seems a lot more intelligent than the built-in Windows Explorer copy/move dialog. The other nice thing about TeraCopy is that it seamlessly replaces the original Explorer dialog, so all you have to do to use it is just drag and drop (or Cut/Copy and Paste with the menu or keyboard shortcuts) like you usually would.

The second, Direct Folders, improves the File Open/Save dialog and adds a shortcut menu to any folder in Explorer.

  1. TeraCopy (http://www.codesector.com/teracopy.php)
    Copies files faster and smarter than Windows Explorer’s built-in copy function (this program replaces it) – asks you questions at the *beginning* of the copy operation instead of getting halfway through, then asking if you want to overwrite something.

  2. Direct Folders (http://www.codesector.com/directfolders.php)
    Makes it easier to navigate to a specified set of folders – gives you a shortcut list by double-clicking on the desktop, or the blank space in any Explorer folder window.

Instant Eyedropper

This little tool is awesome. It’s like the eyedropper in Photoshop, except that it works on any pixel of your screen and gives you the hex code for the color in your clipboard. Very cool!

How it works

  1. Move the mouse pointer to the Instant Eyedropper icon in the system tray.

    Step One

  2. Press and hold the left mouse button and move the mouse pointer to the pixel whose color you want to identify.

    Step One

  3. Release the mouse button.

That’s it. The clipboard now contains the color code – in HTML format (or any other format that you have previously specified). It can be pasted and used in any text or HTML editor or the Color Picker tool of Photoshop.

(http://instant-eyedropper.com/)

Flickr Batch Download Tools

It surprises me that good flickr batch downloading tools are so hard to find! I’ve been on a kick lately, per suggestions from flickr advice articles, to archive and remove my point-and-shoot shots from my flickr photostream so that I can focus on my more artistic work.

To this end, I’ve been looking for a good tool to download my old photos, and have found three good candidates:

1. FlickrEdit (Java)

FlickrEditSunkencityHeader

From the looks of this application, it *should* be the one-stop shop for all of your flickr downloading needs, but for some reason, it consistently failed on my machine. After about twenty failed attempts, I gave up. Hopefully this is just a small bug, but I got dissuaded from using it very quickly. Nonetheless, it looks like a solid app, and it’s probably worth a look. (Please let me know if it works for you, and which version of Java you have installed – I can’t figure out what was wrong with it.)

2. Flump (Adobe AIR)

2742770656_8401a25013_o

Flump is a super lightweight, no-nonsense photo downloading tool. You just give it an account, a location to download, and a file mask. It will download all of the photos from that account. The downside? It will *only* download all the photos from that account. If you’re trying to only back up a selection of your flickr stream, you’ll have to wait until the downloading sequence gets that far. But, it’s still worth a look because it’s just that easy to use.

3. FlickrDown (Windows/.NET 2.0)

flickrdown-ui

FlickrDown is by far my favorite of the bunch. It’s super simple to use, gives you a great selection of your sets (and allows you to choose all your photos), and is quite solid. This is well worth the small download. Windows only, though. (Or, you might be able to rig it to run on Mono.)

Update: Just found this via Lifehacker: Flickr AutoDownloadr. Haven’t checked it out yet, but it looks promising.

Lifehacker: Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets

Another great article from Lifehacker about bookmarklets:

Having a good set of bookmarklets on your browser’s toolbar is like having a web-savvy Leatherman handy—you can take them anywhere, use them in many situations, and they just simply work. A bookmarklet is a little different than a plain old bookmark—it’s a snippet of JavaScript that can perform all sorts of magic on the web page you’re currently viewing. You add bookmarklets to your bookmarks collection to get all sorts of things done as you surf the web. Let’s take a look at some of the best bookmarklets available, which can help you search and email, download videos, and work out some of the web’s kinks.

To start using a bookmarklet, make sure your browser’s bookmarks toolbar is visible. Then, drag and drop the bookmarklet link (enclosed in square brackets below each item on this post) to your bookmarks toolbar. When you’re on a page you want to use the bookmarklet? Just click its name on your toolbar.

(via Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets)