Tech-Recipes: Kill a Windows process from the command line

Awesome. =)

If you know the name of a process to kill, for example notepad.exe, use the following command from a command prompt to end it:

taskkill /IM notepad.exe

This will cause the program to terminate gracefully, asking for confirmation if there are unsaved changes. To forcefully kill the same process, add the /F option to the command line. Be careful with the /F option as it will terminate all matching processes without confirmation.

(via XP: kill a Windows process from the command line with taskkill | Windows | Tech-Recipes.)

iPhone Headphone Mic/Button Not Working?

I started experiencing a very strange problem the other day – my iPhone’s stock headphones could no longer be used to play/pause the music or answer calls with the button on the cord, nor could anyone hear me talking when I had the headphones on.

When I first got my iPhone, I could either use the stock headphones’ mic or plug in third-party headphones and talk over the iPhone’s internal mic, but since last week or so, neither worked.

I then found these articles, which didn’t really seem to help:

At this point, I decided to take it in to the Apple store, thinking that they might not help me because of my phone’s special configuration, and of course, they told me to restore the phone to the stock firmware, back it up, and take it in for repair once that had been done.

On a whim, though, the girl who was helping me at the Apple store decided to take a look at the headphone jack itself and found it to be full of pocket lint. After digging it out with a small screwdriver, the headset (and my third-party headphones) worked fine again.

…Yep, pocket lint.

So, if you’re having the same problem (which, as I was told, is more common for guys since we tend to carry the phones in jeans pockets that pick up a lot of lint), try cleaning out the jack with a small pick or screwdriver. Canned air alone didn’t seem to do the trick, but if it works for you, awesome. =)

And, if cleaning out the headphone jack still doesn’t help, or there wasn’t any gunk in there in the first place, this post might help you out instead:

(Why I couldn’t find that site when I first looked I still don’t quite understand…)

Microsoft Support: Console (CMD) Fonts

Update: You can use the following registry script to automate this process – just copy/paste the code block below into a text file called “Add Consolas to CMD.reg” and run it:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont]
"0"="Lucida Console"
"00"="Consolas"
RegEdit -  Console Fonts
RegEdit - Console Fonts

If you’d like to use an alternative console font for CMD.exe in Windows, check out the scoop from Microsoft Support on how to set it up…

The fonts must meet the following criteria to be available in a command session window:

  • The font must be a fixed-pitch font.
  • The font cannot be an italic font.
  • The font cannot have a negative A or C space.
  • If it is a TrueType font, it must be FF_MODERN.
  • If it is not a TrueType font, it must be OEM_CHARSET.

Additional criteria for Asian installations:

  • If it is not a TrueType font, the face name must be “Terminal.”
  • If it is an Asian TrueType font, it must also be an Asian character set.

In Windows 2000, the installation of Console Fonts is no longer automated. This was done to give the console window greater stability in multilanguage environments. An unsupported work around is available by adding the following font specific entry:

Add a String Value
Name=00
Data= “Font Name” (without “”)

Into the following registry:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont

The name needs to be incrimented with “0” for each additional font. The Data entry needs to match the font’s entry in the following registry location:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Fonts

via Necessary criteria for fonts to be available in a command window.

And, if you’re itching to find a nice replacement for Courier New or Lucida Console:

  • Consolas:
    If you have Windows Vista or windows 7, this is already installed, otherwise you’ll need to download the PowerPoint Viewer 2007 from Microsoft to get the font legally. (As an added bonus, the rest of the Windows Vista fonts come with it – see here for details: Download Windows Vista Fonts from Microsoft Office Website)
  • DejaVu Sans Mono:
    This font comes pre-installed with many current Linux distributions and is released under a free license, which makes this font arguably the best of the bunch. Find it here: http://dejavu-fonts.org/wiki/index.php?title=Download
  • Droid Sans Mono:
    Straight from the Android SDK comes the Droid Sans Mono font, which is quite similar to the DejaVu Sans Mono font listed above. You can grab this from the Android SDK download, or you can get it directly from the damieng blog here: Droid Sans Mono great coding font

Need Help Identifying A Motherboard?

I stumbled upon this page at Intel while trying to identify a motherboard that had no clear model number (the only designation that was obvious was E210882) and thought I’d share, since it was quite helpful. =)

Desktop Boards
Search by AA numbers

If you know your AA (or Altered Assembly) number, you can use our search engine to find information on your Intel® Desktop Board. You will only need to know the first 6 digits of your board’s AA number (Figure 1). Type these 6 numbers into the search box in the left hand channel (Figure 2), and press the go button.

Note: It is important not to include the -xxx to the number, and only search on the first 6 numbers.

Finding the first 6 digits of your Altered Assembly number

Figure 1: Finding the first 6 digits of your AA number

Figure 2: Entering the 6 digit number into the search box

The image below shows an example of the label placement on a board.

via Desktop Boards – Search by AA numbers.