dPS: How to Win Friends and Influence People – A Guide to Commenting on Other People’s Photos

Great post about how to effectively comment on Flickr photos. (I’ll admit, I’m guilty of the two-word-comment myself, so this is good advice for me, personally.)

One of the ten things I hate about Flickr is people who don’t know how to comment on photos. In a recent post to my blog, I lamented the number of comments I receive on my photos which consist of only one or two words: “Frankly, I don’t care if you think my photo’s “Awesome!”, I care even less if you think it’s a “Cool photo”. I’ve put a lot of work into it, I’d genuinely like to know what you think of it and why. If you’re going to comment, why not take the extra 30 seconds, engage your brain, and say something insightful.”

In the lively discussion that followed, it occurred to me that these commenters may not just be lazy. Some said they don’t feel confident enough, or have enough knowledge to feel worthy of making a comment. Others said they have a hard time expressing their feelings. And some simply don’t know what to say. I want to help fix that.

Even though a discussion about Flickr prompted this guide, and the examples I use are all from Flickr, it applies equally well to any online photography or art community, where people comment on the works uploaded by others.

(continued at digital Photography School)

Windows Photo Gallery: Beige Color Fix

This seems to be a pretty common problem in Windows Vista, related to invalid/corrupt color profiles – if you’re experiencing this issue, you’ll see a beige color bleeding through the image from the background where a white background should be. Here’s an example (thanks to matthewrowan.spaces.live.com!):

y1peejIUGYPM8zDoJaegMIgj9nEaEGrjRanJxPnScs5Sp86J0gPCSgjq4-F7gqit588xrwVgylDrYKa16ExRjk-rH7GnOfOvTwy

And, what it should look like:

y1peejIUGYPM8xXMUvoFe67RkGS6QClTfxgodJ5jY8KXI_1qvGbg__j3RMzUqSl2adkwpVBj27SDeswgKQAQqhgVDGBdIRqtaU6

Luckily, there is a fix (again, via matthewrowan.spaces.live.com):

After a little searching for how to change the background color, I found other people with this symptom describing it as an off color, yellow tint, orange or yellowish tinge, beige, cream colored background which, shows through the picture itself, distorts the colours, or bleeds through pictures. In most situations the problem went away in slide show mode. This was an annoying issue, making me avoid looking at pictures whatsoever in Windows Photo Gallery. This wasn’t that much of an issue because I do not use photos or pictures often on my development machine. But before I was going to install Vista on my other computer where I view photos constantly, I needed to ensure that I would not have this issue.

The solution can be found here:
Windows Vista Photo Gallery Yellow Tint Background Problem

(via Windows Photo Gallery background color bleeding through pictures)

Know Your DSLR: How to remove dust spots

Great article from knowyourdslr.com about how to remove dust spots from your photos:

Spot Healing Tool
Spot Healing Tool

If you use a DSLR, sooner or later you’re going to find yourself swapping lenses – that kit lens that came with the camera isn’t going to do all the jobs all the time. That means, sooner or later, you’re going to find yourself facing a problem that photographers have faced since the advent of interchangeable lenses: dust.

Dust is a huge problem: it’s next to impossible to prevent, hard to get rid of and it ruins the best of shots. Many recent DSLRs have self-cleaning sensors to try to minimise the problem, and some can have custom dust maps created so that dust spots are removed in-camera, but knowing how to use the heal tool to get rid of those conspicuous dark spots is a must.

(continue reading at www.knowyourdslr.com)

6 Tips for Perfect Composition in Portrait Photography

The following guest post on composition for portrait photography was submitted by Christina Dickson, a portrait photographer and photography instructor from Portland, Oregon. Her work can be seen at: www.christinanicholephotography.com.

1. Fill the frame with your subject

A portrait is about the person, so don’t be afraid to zoom in close! Remember that zooming in does not mean capturing only face shots. You can also capture “tight”, close up shots of your subject sitting on a stool or leaning into a tree.

2. Keep eyes in the upper third

This is the most natural spacing for a portrait. Try not to divert from this rule unless you are deliberately creating tension. Another exception of this rule is when a subject is full-bodied in the bottom third of the frame.

3. Use framing to concentrate all attention on your subject

Rather than eliminate the environment, use it! Doorways, arches, windows, gazebos are all creative solutions that allow for maximum subject focus and heightened visual interest.

(continued via digital Photography School)