Top 10 Tips For New Eclipse Users | Ben Pryor’s blog

Great tips for Eclipse users; I really could have used these for my last Java project:

  1. Use Code Assist
  2. Navigate Through Code By ctrl-Clicking
  3. Quickly Open Classes and Resources by Name
  4. Know the Keyboard Shortcuts
  5. Set the Heap Size
  6. Configure Eclipse To Use a JDK, not a JRE
  7. Use the Eclipse’s Refactoring Support and Code Generation
  8. Use Multiple Workspaces Effectively
  9. Use Templates
  10. Set Type Filters

Find the details on these tips here…
Top 10 Tips For New Eclipse Users | Ben Pryor’s blog.

E18 Error Fixed! (Canon PowerShot SD450)

Huzzah! I finally fixed the E18 error I’ve been experiencing on my Canon PowerShot SD450, which prevented my lens from extending when the power was turned on, and the fix wasn’t nearly as difficult as I had expected. I’ve even snapped some shots of the process so that you can follow along at home, and fix your own camera if you are experiencing the same problem that I was.

Canon_Ixus_II_with_E18_errorIf you’re not yet familiar with the E18 error, check out this information on the topic from Wikipedia:

The E18 error is an error message on Canon digital cameras. The E18 error occurs when anything prevents the zoom lens from properly extending or retracting.[1] The error has become notorious in the Canon user community as it can completely disable the camera, requiring expensive repairs.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E18_error)

This is a fairly prevalent problem with the PowerShot cameras, and a class action lawsuit was filed (but dismissed) against Canon:

A Chicago law firm, Horwitz, Horwitz & Associates, has already filed a class action,[4] while the law firm of Girard Gibbs & De Bartolomeo LLP are investigating this camera flaw and may issue a class-action lawsuit against Canon.[5] There is at least one other.[6] Although the suit was dismissed in a court of law, the plaintiffs are appealing.

Fortunately, at least in my case, the fix did not require returning the camera to a Canon repair facility or having to take unreasonably complex steps.

My solution for the PowerShot SD450/IXUS 55 follows:
(You’ll need a very small Philips head screwdriver, #00, to remove the screws)

  1. There are six screws holding the metal frame of the camera body together, two on each side, and two on the bottom. Remove all screws, pop the strap-hook plate (sorry, probably not the most technical term there), then gently lift the front plate off by pulling up from the bottom, and remove the back plate in the same fashion. These should come off relatively easily. This is what the camera should look like as you remove the plates:
    IMG_5340
    IMG_5342
    IMG_5344
  2. Now, looking from the top of the camera, you should see a small motor on the left side, as shown below (it’s beneath the cable with a “22” written on it):
    IMG_5346
  3. Take your screwdriver (or another small instrument) and gently try to rotate the plastic piece attached to the motor on the left side, as shown below:
    IMG_5359
  4. At this point, try placing the battery back in the camera (if you have removed it), turn the camera to one of the capture modes, and press the power button. If all went well, your lens should now be able to extend and retract properly.

Further information (and other repair tutorials) are available at the following locations:

Unforunately, the site that had the most comprehensive information about this issue, e18error.com, seems to be down for the time being. Here’s a quote from their site that I saved in another blog post before the site was taken down:

HOW IT ALL WORKS:
Canon E18 error happens when the lens gets stuck while trying to extend. The camera will beep a few times and the LCD will display a little E18 in the lower-left corner. The lens gets stuck in the extended position, and refuses to move either to focus the lens or to retract when powered off.

Apparently, people who posted about this incident on forums say they had to send the camera for repair and that Canon has horrible customer support and response time.

Here is how the E18 error looks like. You just get a black screen with small “E18″ sign in the lower-left corner:

The problem usually happens because dirt or sand get into the lens mechanism. But it seems that more and more people are showing, who took great care of their camera, and still started receiving E18 errors.

(http://www.e18error.com/)

Please share your experiences with this fix, or the E18 error in general, in the comments below. Thanks for reading!

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

I have no idea if The Manga Guide to Databases will be any good (the publisher sez, “In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.”) but I sure hope it’s the start of a trend. I want a manga guide to supersymmetry, the surplus labor theory of value, tensor calculus and many other elusive concepts.

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

WordPress.com: How To Embed Video

With the exception of YouTube, I always keep forgetting how to embed video into a WordPress.com blog post (hint: it’s not the embed code). Here’s a handy little quick reference on how to embed video from different sources and how to embed other sorts of media:

What shortcodes does WordPress use?

[audio] converts a link to an mp3 file into an audio player. See full instructions here.

[caption] adds a caption to an image. See full instructions here.

[digg] embeds a voting button for your link on Digg. See full instructions here.

[flickr] embeds a Flickr video. See full instructions here.

[gallery] displays a thumbnail gallery of images attached to that post or page. See full instructions here.

embeds Google Maps. See full instructions here.

[googlevideo] embeds a Google Video. See full instructions here.

[livevideo] embeds a video from LiveVideo. See full instructions here.

[odeo] embeds an Odeo audio file. See full instructions here.

[podtech] embeds audio or video from the PodTech Network. See full instructions here.

[polldaddy] embeds a PollDaddy poll(use without the space). See full instructions here.

[redlasso] embeds a video from Redlasso. See full instructions here.

[rockyou] embeds a slideshow from RockYou. See full instructions here.

[slideshare] embeds a slideshow from Slideshare.net. See full instructions here.

[sourcecode] preserves the formatting of source code. See full instructions here.

[splashcast] embeds Splashcast media. See full instructions here.

[vimeo] embeds a Vimeo video. See full instructions here.

[youtube] embeds a YouTube video. See full instructions here.

Looks like it’s much more flexible than I thought, though it would still be easier just to support copy/paste of embed code (though, I understand why they don’t do it, for security reasons, etc.)

Update: For some reason, DailyMotion didn’t get included in this list, but you can find the instructions here:

Consolas as CMD.EXE (Windows Console) Font

2008-09-15_130451

First, you’ll need the Consolas font. If you’re not currently running Windows Vista, then you’ll need to get it via the PowerPoint Presentation Viewer, which will install Consolas, among other nice Vista fonts. (Or, if you have Visual Studio 2005 or 2008, you can just grab the Consolas Font Pack for Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 or 2008)

Once you have this font installed, open up Registry Editor (regedit.exe) and navigate to the following key, as shown below:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont\

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Then, right click in the blank area and choose New > String Value.

Double click this new value and enter the following information:

Name: 00
Data: Consolas

Your window should now look like this:

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Once this is done, open a console window (cmd.exe) and choose Consolas from the Font tab:

2008-09-15_131335

Thanks to Scott Hanselman’s Computer Zen for the tips on how to set this up! 🙂

Update: There seems to be an easier way to do this, as I just found from the IEBlog:

Bryn Spears on the Internet Explorer team gave me the following simple instructions to turn on Consolas in the CMD Window:

reg add “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Console\TrueTypeFont” /v 00 /d Consolas

logoff

Note: In Windows Vista, you need to run the reg command from an elevated command prompt.

When you log back in, Consolas will be an option in the “Command Prompt” Properties.  (n.b., Bryn tells me it actually shows up before you relog, but it won’t work.)