Super Awesome Firefox 3 Tips! (All Platforms)

Just a little collection of tips and tricks I’ve compiled from my browsing about the interwebs. Hopefully they’ll be as useful to you as they were to me! 🙂

(And here’s more tips for Firefox 3 on Linux: Super Awesome Firefox 3 Tips! (Linux))

Disable Installation Delay of Extensions

  1. Open Firefox.
  2. In the Location Bar, input about:config.
  3. Click to get past the warning message that appears.
  4. Locate the Preference Name security.dialog_enable_delay.
  5. Double-click the preference and change the value to 0.

Force old Firefox Extensions to work in Minefield or Nightly-Trunk

  1. Open Firefox
  2. In the Location Bar, input about:config.
  3. Click to get past the warning message that appears.
  4. Right-click on any of the values and select New > Boolean
  5. Add the value extensions.checkCompatibility and set it to False.
  6. Right-click on any of the values and select New > Boolean
  7. Add the value extensions.checkUpdateSecurity and set it to False.
  8. You should now be able to use your extensions from Firefox 3.x in Minefield.

Shrink Firefox 3’s Supersized Back Button

If you’re not a fan of Firefox 3’s large back button, you don’t have to wrangle with CSS or themes to adjust its size. Simply right-click on Firefox’s toolbar, and choose Customize. In the dialog box, select “Use small icons”—and voila! Your back button will be the same size as reload.

(You can also “revert” to a retro Firefox theme here – https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/7645)

Firefox Minefield: Faster Than Chrome

  1. Download and install the latest nightly build.
  2. Start tracemonkey javascript engine by going to about:config and enabling the option javascript.options.jit.content. (Set it to True.)
  3. Browse websites blazingly fast!

According to some tests it is 10% faster than Google Chrome.

…Stay tuned, more tips to come!

NETTUTS: 10 Challenging But Awesome CSS Techniques

Very, very cool article for web designers:

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Most designers and web developers only scratch the surface of the potent language that is CSS. In terms of programming languages, CSS has a fairly simple learning curve. That doesn’t mean that CSS isn’t a powerful language. Sometimes it’s the small things that make a huge difference in a website design.

In this post we’re going to outline 10 awesome CSS techniques for web developers who know their stuff.

There are plenty of CSS techniques and hacks out there for beginning designers. Everyone knows about the routine tricks like:

These simple tricks are all fine and very important, but today we’re going to look at some CSS techniques that are a bit more challenging. They’re not the run-of-the-mill techniques you’d teach a CSS beginner. These 10 tricks are slightly more difficult, but if done well they can add an extra special something to your website layout.

(http://nettuts.com/html-css-techniques/10-challenging-but-awesome-css-techniques/)

Lifehacker: Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets

Another great article from Lifehacker about bookmarklets:

Having a good set of bookmarklets on your browser’s toolbar is like having a web-savvy Leatherman handy—you can take them anywhere, use them in many situations, and they just simply work. A bookmarklet is a little different than a plain old bookmark—it’s a snippet of JavaScript that can perform all sorts of magic on the web page you’re currently viewing. You add bookmarklets to your bookmarks collection to get all sorts of things done as you surf the web. Let’s take a look at some of the best bookmarklets available, which can help you search and email, download videos, and work out some of the web’s kinks.

To start using a bookmarklet, make sure your browser’s bookmarks toolbar is visible. Then, drag and drop the bookmarklet link (enclosed in square brackets below each item on this post) to your bookmarks toolbar. When you’re on a page you want to use the bookmarklet? Just click its name on your toolbar.

(via Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets)

SundryBuzz: Two Tricks for Taking Good Group Photos

Great article from SundryBuzz about taking good group photos:

It’s difficult to get a group photo without most of the participants looking as if their captors were forcing them to look natural for the security cameras. In my family, we have two tricks for getting good group shots. The right trick to use depends on what type of situation you are trying to photograph.

(via Two Tricks for Taking Good Group Photos)

DPS: 5 Quick Tips To Keep You Motivated

Great post from digital Photography School about how to keep yourself motivated in your photographic endeavors:

We all have those days. Days where you know you want to do something with your camera or photographs, but the motivation tank is on Empty. I’ve been having some of those days recently and came up with a list to help pop me out of the rut and back to being productive. This list is by no means exhaustive and I’d appreciate any additions that work for you, in the comments section.

TIP #1 – Go for a walk
Copyright marta the good oneI know, I know. It’s one of the hardest things to do when you’re not feeling motivated. Even worse if it’s raining outside. But getting your bum off the chair or sofa and out the door is a great first step. It is a lot easier to just keep staring at the computer screen and letting your analytical mind wander, sometimes feeling like you’re accomplishing something, but getting your blood pumping and elevating your heart rate will help activate your creative mind. It doesn’t need to be a long or fast walk. Just 15 minutes will be enough to get the juices flowing.

It also helps because it removes you from an environment that is obviously not helping you become creative at the moment. I like this method because it requires no special equipment, clothes or location. Everyone has ‘outside’ out their front door. Just lace up some shoes or boots and get your heart going!

(via 5 Quick Tips To Keep You Motivated)