the hamstu » The Typography of Code

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Cool post with a lot of great history and font samples!

As a self proclaimed programmer/designer I enjoy not only the logical and practical things in life, but also the beautiful and well designed. And I find the greatest pleasure when these things converge to produce something extraordinary.One such thing is Typography. Typography is the art of language, the visualization of the spoken word. A medium by which non-verbal communication is made possible. And though I profess no expertise in this art, I have come to deeply appreciate it’s power and ability to convey the same message in so many different ways. Each with a unique feeling and style.

The Messenger

In 1956 Howard Kettler designed the typeface Courier. It was made for IBM’s new (and revolutionary) line of electric typewriters. Originally called “Messenger”, Courier is one of the earliest fixed-pitch (also known as Monospace) fonts, meaning each character takes up the same amount of space on a line; allowing for easy tabular alignment and legibility.

Courier was a hit, and as many made the transition from typewriter to computer, this classic typeface wasn’t far behind. It was included in all early Apple computers, and while creating the core fonts for Windows 3.1, Microsoft hired Monotype Typography to give Courier a makeover. And so Courier New was born, as a thinner and cleaner version of it’s former self.

via the hamstu » The Typography of Code.

C# Corner: How to get distinct rows from a DataSet or DataTable

Not without its typos, but quite a helpful article nonetheless… 😉

One of the common issues in data layer is avoiding duplicate rows from dataset or datatable. I saw many people are writing separate function and looping through the datatable to avoid the duplicates. There is more simple ways available in .Net but people are unaware about this. I thought of writing a blog about this because I saw many blogs which mislead the people from right path. Thers is no need of looping or no need of logic are required to avoid the duplicates.

Following single line of code will avoid the duplicate rows.

ds.Tables[“Employee”].DefaultView.ToTable(true,”employeeid”);

ds – Dataset object

dt.DefaultView.ToTable( true, “employeeid”);

dt – DataTable object

First option in ToTable is a boolean which indicates, you want distinct rows or not?

Second option in the ToTable is the column name based on which we have to select distinct rows.

Simple right, this option is the last one so most of the people didn’t got the time to find it. Now your code will look much cleaner without those junk codes.

via How to get [distinct] rows from a DataSet or Datatable? by shyju.

Best T-SQL Ever! (The T-SQL Mandelbrot)

This is just pure awesome, from a geek standpoint. Thanks to The Daily WTF and Graeme Job for sharing this wonderful little jewel of code and making my day just a bit more interesting. 😉

Here’s the quote from The Daily WTF:

“So I was bored at work one day,” Graeme Job explains, “and wondered, what’s the most useless thing I could do with my time without actually doing anything. Then it hit me. I could use T-SQL to generate… Mandelbrot.”

Graeme continued, “Following is a single T-SQL SELECT statement that generates a text-representation of a Mandelbrot Set. The results are best viewed in text-mode.”

You can grab the code from The Daily WTF, and run it via SQL Server Management Studio. Of course, I tried it myself, and got this result:

2008-11-20_113348

(via http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Stupid-Coding-Tricks-The-TSQL-Madlebrot.aspx)

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

I have no idea if The Manga Guide to Databases will be any good (the publisher sez, “In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.”) but I sure hope it’s the start of a trend. I want a manga guide to supersymmetry, the surplus labor theory of value, tensor calculus and many other elusive concepts.

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

Slashdot: F/OSS Flat-File Database

Good question, actually. See the link for some answers from the /. community:

Leemeng writes “I’m looking for a simple, free, and F/OSS flat-file database program. I’m storing info about Wi-Fi access points that I come across, maybe 8-9 fields per entry. I’ve outgrown Notepad. This info is for my own reference only; it is not going on a Web server. Googling was unhelpful, with results skewed towards SQL, Access (MS), and Oracle, all of which would be overkill for my purposes. My criteria are: it must be simple, F/OSS, must work in Windows Vista, preferably use a portable format, must not be an online app, and must not require Java. Does such a beast exist?”

(via http://developers.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/05/20/2150246)