MiniBin!

Update!

e-Sushi has posted a new version of MiniBin after all! You can find the new version at e-Sushi.net (http://www.e-sushi.net/minibin), or you can still download the old version (3.8.3.0) below.

One of my favorite Windows utilities, MiniBin, has just been retired by its developer, so I’m creating a post here to make the download available after its binaries get pulled from the original website.

MiniBin-3.8.3.0-Setup.zip

(Thanks to Mike Edward Moras for making such a great app!)

Details from e-sushi.net:

MiniBin is a free recycle bin for your Microsoft Windows system tray area; the area next to the clock in your taskbar.

Please note that the MiniBin project has ended. This means: no more updates and no more support. Yes, I know… but it had to end somewhere. MiniBin was first published in 2004 and enjoyed updates until 2012. As it’s bug-free and feature-complete in it’s current state, I decided it’s time to move on to new horizons.

For the time being, you can still download the final version of MiniBin, the recycle bin for your system. But this download will vanish into the void within the not so far future. So, get it while it’s still available!

Lifehacker – LightBox Makes Simple Touch-Ups a Snap

I’m downloading this now – looks very cool. =)

Windows only: LightBox is an extremely user friendly tool for editing photos when you need more than a simple crop and resize but less than a full out Photoshop massaging.

How user friendly is LightBox? When you run the program you’re presented with a sidebar of common tasks like color balancing and red-eye removal. Mousing over each of them provides not only an explanation of the tool but sample pictures showing the results and every tool within the editor itself has mouse over tips. Once you’re actually editing your image you can easily—as seen in the screenshot above—divide the image to show how the alterations are effecting it compared to the original. The divided and side by side comparison feature is great for photo enhancements where your goal is to make the picture more appealing without giving it an unrealistic appearance. If you need additional functionality, there is a Plus version available for $19.95 which adds on features like masking and auto color correction. The basic version of LightBox is freeware, Windows only.

via Lifehacker – LightBox Makes Simple Touch-Ups a Snap – Image Editing.

Best Of 2008: Most Popular Free Windows Downloads of 2008

From Lifehacker:

In the past year we’ve highlighted hundreds of Windows apps aimed at making your life easier, boosting your computer productivity, and powering up your PC.

For those of you who weren’t able to keep up, here’s a look back at the most popular Windows downloads of 2008.

Keep in mind that this list is based on the popularity of posts we’ve published in 2008 only, regardless of the original release date of the app. Many were brand new this year, while others were solid updates to popular software. Here’s the full run-down of the 12 most popular Windows downloads of 2008:

via Best Of 2008: Most Popular Free Windows Downloads of 2008.

Coding Horror: The Years of Experience Myth

This toxic, counterproductive years of experience myth has permeated the software industry for as long as I can remember. Imagine how many brilliant software engineers companies are missing out on because they are completely obsessed with finding people who match– exactly and to the letter– some highly specific laundry list of skills.

Somehow, they’ve forgetten that what software developers do best is learn. Employers should be loooking for passionate, driven, flexible self-educators who have a proven ability to code in whatever language — and serving them up interesting projects they can engage with.

It’s been shown time and time again that there is no correlation between years of experience and skill in programming. After about six to twelve months working in any particular technology stack, you either get it or you don’t. No matter how many years of “experience” another programmer has under their belt, there’s about even odds that they have no idea what they’re doing. This is why working programmers quickly learn to view their peers with a degree of world-weary skepticism.
Perhaps it’s the only rational response when the disconnect between experience and skill is so pervasive in the field of software engineering.

(via Coding Horror: The Years of Experience Myth)