dPS: How To Remove Dust Spots From Multiple Photos in 4 Steps

Another excellent article from digital Photography School, about how to remove dust spots from your photos. I’m going to need to try this out on my own photos, especially after that full day of shooting with a dirty sensor (see the before/after examples here: https://blog.wolffmyren.com/2008/07/07/before-cleaning/ and here: https://blog.wolffmyren.com/2008/07/07/after-cleaning/)

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Dust. The eternal enemy of a digital camera. When you shoot pictures with a digital SLR camera long enough, you will come to know the pain that dust can cause. For some it’s a minor annoyance. For others, it costs time and money attempting to salvage vital images.

In this post Peter Carey shares some tips on how to remove dust spots from multiple photos.

With advancements in DLSRs has also come advancements in Photoshop tools to remove dust. My favorite for dust removal, partially because of its price, is Photoshop Lightroom. While it is a scaled down version of the full blown Photoshop, it is perfectly suited to remove 90% of the dust I encounter.

Why is dust such a problem? Take a look at the picture on the left. Do you notice the small black spots in the sky and one big spot on the left side in the mountain? Those are not UFOs and that is not a mining tunnel. It was dust adhered to the sensor, casting a black shadow on the sensor when the shutter was activated. You can’t get back the data that is covered over by the shadow, but you can get creative and repair the damage depending on the dust location. When those dust spots are in the same location on each image, you’re in luck as there is a fairly easy method for multiple photo dust spot removal. (Note: the instructions are given using a PC version of Lightroom 1.4. Mac instructions vary only slightly if using a single button mouse)

(continue reading via: How To Remove Dust Spots From Multiple Photos in 4 Steps)

Flickr: Group Guidelines

Well worth a read, especially since I just started a group myself (Remix/Remash):

Tips for running your group
Ultimately it is the Admins that decide what the rules are for their group, but if you have been made an admin of a Flickr group, here are some suggestions for keeping your group happy:
Admin Guidelines
If you are the administrator of a group, here are some pointers for creating a thriving community:

  1. Invite your friends and anyone you know who is interested in what you are interested in. Having group members is the first step in having a successful group!
  2. Visit the group frequently. Groups thrive with daily discussion, and with daily responses from other members of the community, in chat and on the discussion boards.
  3. Moderate, moderate, moderate! Successful groups are kept in check by good moderation. Tend that garden; pull the weeds, mow the lawn, prune the roses, etc. To help you moderate your group, you can enlist other members to become moderators. Moderators don’t have full administrative power, but they can help you moderate pool submissions, keep tabs on discussions, and weed out the people who don’t play by the rules.

(via http://www.flickr.com/groups_guidelines.gne)

DestroyFlickr

This is a super-slick Adobe AIR application which you can use to browse Flickr. Check out the screenshots below:

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As you can see, it’s a pretty slick application. And, since you might be interested, you can find the photo in the screenshot above here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gmhennessey/2757101923/

DestroyFlickr, on the other hand, can be found here:

http://www.destroytoday.com/?p=Project&id=DestroyFlickr

I must say, it’s well worth the small download and simple install. Very slick. 🙂

words:irrational – Pick of the Week

Woo-hoo! One of my photos was picked for the “Pick of the Week: Photo Edition”, thanks to A. Marques on Flickr! Here’s a screencap of the post; my photo is third from the left in the first row!

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In case you’re interested, here’s my photo:

And here’s the “Pick of the Week” blog post at words:irrational (http://www.tzplanet.com/words)

Color Differences

Color Differences

This little experiment was inspired by a photo posted from _Neverletmego_, in which she highlighted the differences in color space between Firefox and Safari on the Macintosh. I was inclined to carry out a similar experiment with three Windows browsers, Safari, Internet Explorer 7, and Firefox. Not surprisingly, Safari has richer and more saturated color (same as on the Mac).

P.S. I’m curious to see how this screenshot looks to users with other browsers than those tested above. =)