The Best Time Tracking App for Windows

This looks pretty fantastic. Do you have any suggestions for time tracking apps – for Windows, Mac, or Linux? I’ve had great luck with RescueTime, but I can definitely use something like Klok for tracking time on consulting projects manually.

The Best Time Tracking App for Windows

There are a number of different ways to track your work time, but for the majority of people, something like the free, cross-platform Klok is perfect for managing your workday, seeing how long your projects take, and tracking how you spend your time.

via The Best Time Tracking App for Windows.

Lifehacker – LightBox Makes Simple Touch-Ups a Snap

I’m downloading this now – looks very cool. =)

Windows only: LightBox is an extremely user friendly tool for editing photos when you need more than a simple crop and resize but less than a full out Photoshop massaging.

How user friendly is LightBox? When you run the program you’re presented with a sidebar of common tasks like color balancing and red-eye removal. Mousing over each of them provides not only an explanation of the tool but sample pictures showing the results and every tool within the editor itself has mouse over tips. Once you’re actually editing your image you can easily—as seen in the screenshot above—divide the image to show how the alterations are effecting it compared to the original. The divided and side by side comparison feature is great for photo enhancements where your goal is to make the picture more appealing without giving it an unrealistic appearance. If you need additional functionality, there is a Plus version available for $19.95 which adds on features like masking and auto color correction. The basic version of LightBox is freeware, Windows only.

via Lifehacker – LightBox Makes Simple Touch-Ups a Snap – Image Editing.

Lifehacker: Take Impressive Macro Photographs with Your Point-and-Shoot and CHDK

This sounds awesome. I’m gonna have to pull out my SD450 and give this a shot…pun intended. 😉

Remember the Canon Hacker’s Development Kit, aka CHDK—the open-source firmware that turns your point-and-shoot into a super-camera? Here’s how bug enthusiast Tim used CHDK and DIY ingenuity for better macro results from his point-and-shoot.

Spending more money was off the table for Tim’s spending budget, so rather than pony up for some new, expensive equipment, he turned to the wonder of open source. His setup is a little heady if you’re not familiar with the subject, but Tim used a reverse mounted lens technique along with the focus bracketing feature of CHDK. The results—one of which you can see in the screenshot—speak for themselves.

via Digital Photography: Take Impressive Macro Photographs with Your Point-and-Shoot and CHDK.

Lifehacker:Top 10 Ways to Lock Down Your Data

Cool list from Lifehacker about how to lock down your data:

  • Wipe that iPhone (or BlackBerry) before trading in.
  • Use virtual credit cards for iffy online buys.
  • Hide data inside files with steganography.
  • Plan for the worst.
  • Get smarter on security questions.
  • Boost your browsing and downloading privacy.
  • Theft-proof your laptop (and its files).
  • Secure your wireless network.
  • Encrypt your data whole or piecemeal.
  • Use KeePass. Love KeePass. Be secure.

Read the details here: Lifehacker Top 10: Top 10 Ways to Lock Down Your Data.

Best Of 2008: Most Popular Free Windows Downloads of 2008

From Lifehacker:

In the past year we’ve highlighted hundreds of Windows apps aimed at making your life easier, boosting your computer productivity, and powering up your PC.

For those of you who weren’t able to keep up, here’s a look back at the most popular Windows downloads of 2008.

Keep in mind that this list is based on the popularity of posts we’ve published in 2008 only, regardless of the original release date of the app. Many were brand new this year, while others were solid updates to popular software. Here’s the full run-down of the 12 most popular Windows downloads of 2008:

via Best Of 2008: Most Popular Free Windows Downloads of 2008.

Lifehacker: Shelf Web Pages Instantly (and Get Back to Work) with ReadItLater

logo

Yeah, I could really use this app. I’ve just been bookmarking links to my Bookmarks Bar in Firefox, then using Foxmarks to synchronize them to my home computer.

BTW, Foxmarks is teh awesome. You should really check it out.

riloptionsheader

Surely you come across web pages during the workday that are completely unrelated to actual work, but that you’d love to save for later—and the previously mentioned (and award winning) Firefox extension ReadItLater does just that really well. Once ReadItLater is part of your everyday workflow, it’s super-easy to park long articles or interesting tidbits you want to look at over lunch or at home in a “staging area” that’s available as an RSS feed, in your regular bookmarks, and even on other computers. ReadItLater may appear unnecessary to power bookmarkers who keep a “later” folder or tag, but on closer inspection it does offer features that make hitting the snooze button on a link much easier.

The Killer Feature: One-click Park

Without ReadItLater, to save a web page in your bookmarks in a “read it later” folder or tag, it takes a couple of steps. (Even with Firefox 3’s one-click bookmarking, you still have to tag or file the link.) With ReadItLater installed, Firefox gets a checkbox in the address bar next to the regular bookmark star icon. Click on that checkbox to automatically add the current web page to your ReadItLater list in one click. That’s it. Now you can get back to work.

(continued at lifehacker.com)