jQuery fadeIn/fadeOut IE cleartype glitch

Thanks to Benjamin Michael Novakovic for this fix!

While using the jQuery  javascript library today at work, I noticed a glitch under IE7. When fading a html node with the .fadeIn() and .fadeOut() functions in jQuery, IE drops the windows Cleartype rendering; which results in very ugly text. This problem appears to be very common, but no one has a nice solution for the problem.

The most common way to solve this problem is by removing the filter CSS attribute. In normal javascript, it would look like this:

document.getElementById('node').style.removeAttribute('filter');

and in jQuery, it would look like this:

$('#node').fadeOut('slow', function() {
   this.style.removeAttribute('filter');
});

via Benjamin Michael Novakovic » jQuery fadeIn/fadeOut IE cleartype glitch.

(jQuery plugin: Validation) Now *this* is the good stuff…

I’ve been playing around with this over the weekend and I’ve been *very* impressed:

jQuery plugin: Validation

Current version: 1.3
Compressed filesize: 14301 bytes
License: MIT/GPL

Files:

Download
Changelog
Demos
Documentation

(more info at http://bassistance.de/jquery-plugins/jquery-plugin-validation/)

@TheKeyboard: Form Validation with jQuery

Great article about jQuery Form Validation from littlehart.net:

Now that I have to actually design interfaces for other people, I am learning the finer details of Javascript. Specifically, I’m using JQuery as my library of choice. I won’t go into why I’m using, just go to the site and see it for yourself. One of the things I’ve had to build recently is a playlist editor for the IPTV project. I decided to be user-friendly for once, and make it Ajax-powered. So this meant a lot of work creating small little actions in my Zend Framework code to accept form posts, etc. Still cleaning things up, but I wanted to share some of the coolness from using a jQuery form plugin .

So, never having really done any Javascript form validation (I know you’re shocked) I unleashed my inner “programmer” to go and hack away at it so I can figure it out, then call back my inner “developer” to make the code elegant and compact. It took me all morning but I figured it out thanks to Google and just hacking away at it. One of the neat things about Javascript is that it supports the ability to dynamically define functions in your code. With it’s extensive use of callbacks, jQuery leverages this to the hilt. I believe this is what the Ruby crowd refers to as “blocks and closures”. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Okay, so here’s some code that illustrates how I was doing validation of the form:

(continued via Form Validation with jQuery)