the hamstu » The Typography of Code

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Cool post with a lot of great history and font samples!

As a self proclaimed programmer/designer I enjoy not only the logical and practical things in life, but also the beautiful and well designed. And I find the greatest pleasure when these things converge to produce something extraordinary.One such thing is Typography. Typography is the art of language, the visualization of the spoken word. A medium by which non-verbal communication is made possible. And though I profess no expertise in this art, I have come to deeply appreciate it’s power and ability to convey the same message in so many different ways. Each with a unique feeling and style.

The Messenger

In 1956 Howard Kettler designed the typeface Courier. It was made for IBM’s new (and revolutionary) line of electric typewriters. Originally called “Messenger”, Courier is one of the earliest fixed-pitch (also known as Monospace) fonts, meaning each character takes up the same amount of space on a line; allowing for easy tabular alignment and legibility.

Courier was a hit, and as many made the transition from typewriter to computer, this classic typeface wasn’t far behind. It was included in all early Apple computers, and while creating the core fonts for Windows 3.1, Microsoft hired Monotype Typography to give Courier a makeover. And so Courier New was born, as a thinner and cleaner version of it’s former self.

via the hamstu » The Typography of Code.

Lifehacker: Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets

Another great article from Lifehacker about bookmarklets:

Having a good set of bookmarklets on your browser’s toolbar is like having a web-savvy Leatherman handy—you can take them anywhere, use them in many situations, and they just simply work. A bookmarklet is a little different than a plain old bookmark—it’s a snippet of JavaScript that can perform all sorts of magic on the web page you’re currently viewing. You add bookmarklets to your bookmarks collection to get all sorts of things done as you surf the web. Let’s take a look at some of the best bookmarklets available, which can help you search and email, download videos, and work out some of the web’s kinks.

To start using a bookmarklet, make sure your browser’s bookmarks toolbar is visible. Then, drag and drop the bookmarklet link (enclosed in square brackets below each item on this post) to your bookmarks toolbar. When you’re on a page you want to use the bookmarklet? Just click its name on your toolbar.

(via Top 10 Useful Bookmarklets)

@TheKeyboard: Form Validation with jQuery

Great article about jQuery Form Validation from littlehart.net:

Now that I have to actually design interfaces for other people, I am learning the finer details of Javascript. Specifically, I’m using JQuery as my library of choice. I won’t go into why I’m using, just go to the site and see it for yourself. One of the things I’ve had to build recently is a playlist editor for the IPTV project. I decided to be user-friendly for once, and make it Ajax-powered. So this meant a lot of work creating small little actions in my Zend Framework code to accept form posts, etc. Still cleaning things up, but I wanted to share some of the coolness from using a jQuery form plugin .

So, never having really done any Javascript form validation (I know you’re shocked) I unleashed my inner “programmer” to go and hack away at it so I can figure it out, then call back my inner “developer” to make the code elegant and compact. It took me all morning but I figured it out thanks to Google and just hacking away at it. One of the neat things about Javascript is that it supports the ability to dynamically define functions in your code. With it’s extensive use of callbacks, jQuery leverages this to the hilt. I believe this is what the Ruby crowd refers to as “blocks and closures”. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Okay, so here’s some code that illustrates how I was doing validation of the form:

(continued via Form Validation with jQuery)