Visual Studio Incremental Search (Type-Ahead Find)

This is just awesome – with Ctrl+I, you can perform a type-ahead search within Visual Studio, just like Firefox!

Again, my buddy Sairama to the rescue. Just when I think I’ve pretty much got VS.NET down solid (only being use it since Pre-Beta days, right?) I’m thrown a curve ball called incremental search. I guess I just assumed that a feature that was so cool in so many other editors would never make it into VS.NET. Silly me.

So, lest I be the most ignorant, fire up Visual Studio.NET, get some code in there, hit Ctrl-I and start typing. After you’ve found something, use F3 to Find Next. In the words of Chris Sells – It’s pure sex.

via Scott Hanselman’s Computer Zen – My ignorance proceeds me: Visual Studio.NET Incremental Search.

@TheKeyboard: Form Validation with jQuery

Great article about jQuery Form Validation from littlehart.net:

Now that I have to actually design interfaces for other people, I am learning the finer details of Javascript. Specifically, I’m using JQuery as my library of choice. I won’t go into why I’m using, just go to the site and see it for yourself. One of the things I’ve had to build recently is a playlist editor for the IPTV project. I decided to be user-friendly for once, and make it Ajax-powered. So this meant a lot of work creating small little actions in my Zend Framework code to accept form posts, etc. Still cleaning things up, but I wanted to share some of the coolness from using a jQuery form plugin .

So, never having really done any Javascript form validation (I know you’re shocked) I unleashed my inner “programmer” to go and hack away at it so I can figure it out, then call back my inner “developer” to make the code elegant and compact. It took me all morning but I figured it out thanks to Google and just hacking away at it. One of the neat things about Javascript is that it supports the ability to dynamically define functions in your code. With it’s extensive use of callbacks, jQuery leverages this to the hilt. I believe this is what the Ruby crowd refers to as “blocks and closures”. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Okay, so here’s some code that illustrates how I was doing validation of the form:

(continued via Form Validation with jQuery)