Instant Eyedropper

This little tool is awesome. It’s like the eyedropper in Photoshop, except that it works on any pixel of your screen and gives you the hex code for the color in your clipboard. Very cool!

How it works

  1. Move the mouse pointer to the Instant Eyedropper icon in the system tray.

    Step One

  2. Press and hold the left mouse button and move the mouse pointer to the pixel whose color you want to identify.

    Step One

  3. Release the mouse button.

That’s it. The clipboard now contains the color code – in HTML format (or any other format that you have previously specified). It can be pasted and used in any text or HTML editor or the Color Picker tool of Photoshop.

(http://instant-eyedropper.com/)

NETTUTS: 10 Challenging But Awesome CSS Techniques

Very, very cool article for web designers:

header_logo

Most designers and web developers only scratch the surface of the potent language that is CSS. In terms of programming languages, CSS has a fairly simple learning curve. That doesn’t mean that CSS isn’t a powerful language. Sometimes it’s the small things that make a huge difference in a website design.

In this post we’re going to outline 10 awesome CSS techniques for web developers who know their stuff.

There are plenty of CSS techniques and hacks out there for beginning designers. Everyone knows about the routine tricks like:

These simple tricks are all fine and very important, but today we’re going to look at some CSS techniques that are a bit more challenging. They’re not the run-of-the-mill techniques you’d teach a CSS beginner. These 10 tricks are slightly more difficult, but if done well they can add an extra special something to your website layout.

(http://nettuts.com/html-css-techniques/10-challenging-but-awesome-css-techniques/)

Convert < > to &lt; &gt;

2008-08-11_105145

Can’t wait to see how WordPress tries to format that URL. πŸ˜‰

Anyway, there’s a great site hosted at Stanford that will convert your HTML code into its character literal equivalents for posting within a webpage / blog post so that it is visible as code instead of being interpreted into formatting.

Quite nice for making Flickr invite/comment code snippets, btw. πŸ™‚

Update: Here’s the URL, by the way: http://www.stanford.edu/~bsuter/js/convert.html

@TheKeyboard: Form Validation with jQuery

Great article about jQuery Form Validation from littlehart.net:

Now that I have to actually design interfaces for other people, I am learning the finer details of Javascript. Specifically, I’m using JQuery as my library of choice. I won’t go into why I’m using, just go to the site and see it for yourself. One of the things I’ve had to build recently is a playlist editor for the IPTV project. I decided to be user-friendly for once, and make it Ajax-powered. So this meant a lot of work creating small little actions in my Zend Framework code to accept form posts, etc. Still cleaning things up, but I wanted to share some of the coolness from using a jQuery form plugin .

So, never having really done any Javascript form validation (I know you’re shocked) I unleashed my inner “programmer” to go and hack away at it so I can figure it out, then call back my inner “developer” to make the code elegant and compact. It took me all morning but I figured it out thanks to Google and just hacking away at it. One of the neat things about Javascript is that it supports the ability to dynamically define functions in your code. With it’s extensive use of callbacks, jQuery leverages this to the hilt. I believe this is what the Ruby crowd refers to as “blocks and closures”. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Okay, so here’s some code that illustrates how I was doing validation of the form:

(continued via Form Validation with jQuery)