How-To Geek: Using Symlinks in Windows Vista

I haven’t tried using my favorite XP junction tool, NTFS-Link, since I upgraded my home computer to Windows Vista, and I’m a little apprehensive since the filesystem has changed a bit. Nonetheless, if you are still using XP, NTFS-Link is an excellent tool for those of you already familiar with symbolic links via other operating systems, such as Linux.

Luckily, Windows Vista does include a command-line tool for creating symbolic links, similar to “ln” in Linux. However, it’s not quite as straightforward. Here’s the scoop from How-To Geek:

Using the mklink Command

The command that you need to use is mklink, which you’ll use from the command line. Just type it on the command line to see the options:

C:Usersgeek>mklink
Creates a symbolic link.

MKLINK [[/D] | [/H] | [/J]] Link Target

        /D      Creates a directory symbolic link.  Default is a file
                symbolic link.
        /H      Creates a hard link instead of a symbolic link.
        /J      Creates a Directory Junction.
        Link    specifies the new symbolic link name.
        Target  specifies the path (relative or absolute) that the new link

(continued via Using Symlinks in Windows Vista)

Play Oregon Trail The Way You Remember It

Great article from How-To Geek about playing classic Oregon Trail on Windows…

33

2 I am a sucker for nostalgic computer games.  Oregon Trail was the first computer game I ever played on the Apple IIe system.  With the help of the Enhanced Apple IIe Emulator and some virtual floppy discs we can relive those golden memories on your current PC.  I am playing this on my Windows XP box.  I am not sure if it works with Vista.

The first thing you need to do is download AppleWin 1.14.0 This is a zip file so just go ahead and extract it where you like.  I just put it on my desktop.  Open the folder and double click on the AppleWin.exe icon to launch the emulator.  To start the virtual machine click on the Apple button on the upper right side.

(continued via Play Oregon Trail The Way You Remember It)

How-To Geek: “Terminal Server Has Exceeded the Maximum Number of Allowed Connections” (Remote Desktop)

Great fix for a problem I commonly have at the office:

If you’ve worked on a network with Windows servers, you’ve encountered this error message at least 37,000 times:

“The terminal server has exceeded the maximum number of allowed connections. The system can not log you on. The system has reached its licensed logon limit. Please try again later.”

This problem happens because Windows only allows two remote terminal services connections when you are in administrative mode, and you’ve either got two people already on that server, or more likely, you’ve got a disconnected session that still thinks it is active.

The problem with this error is that you have to actually get on the server console to fix the problem if the server isn’t in a domain. (If you are in a domain, then just open Terminal Services Manager and log off or disconnect the sessions)

(keep reading via Command Line Hack for: “Terminal Server Has Exceeded the Maximum Number of Allowed Connections”)