jQuery fadeIn/fadeOut IE cleartype glitch

Thanks to Benjamin Michael Novakovic for this fix!

While using the jQuery  javascript library today at work, I noticed a glitch under IE7. When fading a html node with the .fadeIn() and .fadeOut() functions in jQuery, IE drops the windows Cleartype rendering; which results in very ugly text. This problem appears to be very common, but no one has a nice solution for the problem.

The most common way to solve this problem is by removing the filter CSS attribute. In normal javascript, it would look like this:

document.getElementById('node').style.removeAttribute('filter');

and in jQuery, it would look like this:

$('#node').fadeOut('slow', function() {
   this.style.removeAttribute('filter');
});

via Benjamin Michael Novakovic » jQuery fadeIn/fadeOut IE cleartype glitch.

Sofia’s People: Canon 5dmk2 25p on Vimeo

Wow. This is some crispy video. Now I *really* want a 5d Mark II. 😉

Shot over a couple of nights, taking the 5dmk2 out on the streets and getting shots of the inhabitants and visitors. No lighting, no grading. This is what came out of the camera image wise. All handheld and helped by using the Z-Finder from Zacuto to give the camera a proper viewfinder and improve stability.

All shot using one lens. A Nikon mount Zeiss ZF 50mm f1.4

Music is by Stacey Kent: You can’t take that away from me.

Converted to 25p in Compressor.

via Sofia’s People: Canon 5dmk2 25p on Vimeo.

Undead LIVE! Codes!

Update: If you’re looking for Mafia! Live codes, try this post – Mafia Live! Codes!

OK, I’ll admit, I’m a sucker for this game, Undead LIVE! on the iPhone.

If you play as well, please add me to your clan; my code is:

303415013

(Werewolf)

Please feel free to add your own code and clan type to the comment thread on this post.

Thanks! =D

BTW, here are some other sites with codes:

iTunes: Multiple Item Information Problem Fixed!

I was just having the strangest problem with iTunes 8 – the Multiple Item Information window was appearing blank when I’d try to Get Info on multiple items (like when trying to edit properties for an entire album). Luckily, the fix was pretty easy, though not nearly what I would have expected…

(Thanks to BonoChao for this wonderful tip!)

My other computer running WinXP has the same problem, and it’s due to “Direct Folder” that I installed.

  1. Right click on the “Direct Folder” task bar icon,
  2. select “Configure…”
  3. select “Applications” tab
  4. click on “Add”
  5. Browse for iTunes
  6. deselect “Enable resize….”
  7. click on “OK”

Then you’re done. Hope this solves your problem!

via Apple – Support – Discussions – Multiple Item Information – problem ….

Linked Lists Tutorial: mycsresource.net

Linked Lists

Excellent Computer Science resource with tutorials and Java code examples at mycsresource.net – this was very helpful to me in my CS courses…

Linked Lists are a very common way of storing arrays of data. The major benefit of linked lists is that you do not specify a fixed size for your list. The more elements you add to the chain, the bigger the chain gets.

There is more than one type of a linked list, although for the purpose of this tutorial, we’ll stick to singly linked lists (the simplest one). If for example you want a doubly linked list instead, very few simple modifications will give you what you’re looking for. Many data structures (e.g. Stacks, Queues, Binary Trees) are often implemented using the concept of linked lists.

via Linked Lists Tutorial, Examples, and Java code.

LoseThos: Programming As Entertainment

Pretty cool stuff:

LoseThos is for programming as entertainment.  It empowers programmers with kernel privilege because it’s fun.  It allows full access to everything because it’s fun.  It has no bureaucracy because it’s fun.  It’s the way it is by choice because it’s fun. LoseThos is in no way a Windows or Linux wannabe — that would be pointless. LoseThos is not trying to win a prize for low resource usage or run on pathetic hardware.  Low line count is a goal, though.  It’s 100,000 lines of code including a 64-bit compiler, tools and a graphics library.  It’s strictly 64-bit and could be configured to function with 32 Meg or less RAM, but who cares!   Where do you get a x86_64 machine with less than 32 Meg RAM?  With no multimedia, it’s hard to run out of memory on a modern home computer.

LoseThos was designed from scratch with a clean slate and has no compatibility with anything else. Source code is ASCII plus binary graphics data.  It has a new language roughly based C/C++.  It’s more than C and less than C++ so, maybe, it’s C+. I took every opportunity to improve things once I made a clean break with the past.  That’s another reason LoseThos has value — it is innovative.

I started with a command line like this:
Dir(“*.*”);

I added default parameters from C++:
Dir();

I said, “parentheses are stupid.”
Dir;

Now, I have a language which looks a little like pascal.  It also doesn’t have a main() routine — any statement outside a function executes immediately, in order. The command line feeds straight into the compiler (not an interpreter) and it doesn’t have that bullshit errno crap for return values — command line commands are regular C+ functions.

(via http://www.losethos.com/)


The diskette that blew Trixter’s mind

This is pretty obscure, and super old sk00l, but I am completely fascinated. This guy found a disk that was readable by both C64 and IBM PC – quite a rare find indeed…

This diskette has officially blown my mind.

This is the very first time I have ever seen something like this.  The data for the IBM program takes up more than 160KB as evidenced by a DIR.  The C64 1541 drive is a single-sided drive; IBM’s is double-sided. Based on all this, we can deduce how this diskette is structured and why:

– The IBM version of the game required more than 160KB (ie. needed more than one side of a disk), probably because it has a set of files for CGA/Herc (4/2 colors) and another for EGA/Tandy (16 colors) and either set will fit in 160K but both won’t
– The C64 version required around 80K, based on the fact that every other track is unreadable by an IBM drive
– The publisher had the requirement of using only a single disk to save on packaging and media costs
– Not wanting to limit the game to either CGA or EGA, someone at Artech (the developer) built the format of this diskette BY HAND so that DOS would not step on the C64 tracks, and somehow the C64 would also read/boot the disk

I don’t know how the C64 portion boots since track 0 sector 0 looks like a DOS boot sector, but quick research shows that C64 disks keep their index on track 18.  If anyone knows how C64 disks are read and boot, I’d love to know.

The diskette that blew Trixter’s mind « Oldskooler Ramblings.

A/UX Penelope

Very cool informational site about the pre-OSX version of Apple Unix (A/UX). Totally piques my obscure hardware/software interest. 😉

AUX-2x2

From the author’s site:

Between the years 1987 and 1995, Apple Computers, Inc. developed a distribution of System V Unix for the Motorola 680×0-based Macintosh. Much of the initial porting work was performed by UniSoft Corporation, with the project being gradually handed over to Apple Engineers. (UniSoft ported several versions of Unix to Motorola 680×0-based platforms, including the early Sun workstations.)

Apple’s Unix (A/UX) was based on AT&T System V Release 2.2, as the industry had not yet “standardized” on SVR4. However, later versions of the operating system included features from SVR3, and SVR4, as well as BSD Unix 4.2 and 4.3 – TCP/IP networking, streams, Fast File System, job control, lpr, NFS, NIS (Yellow Pages), SCCS, and sendmail. It was a full-featured Unix OS. All of these features, along with a development package (fortran and C) and the X11R4 environment, were included in the base package. Note that these were costly add-ons in many contemporary Unix distributions such as Xenix and SCO Unix.

On top of this solid Unix foundation sat a Macintosh Finder – A full System 7 graphical environment that allowed the system to run both Unix and Macintosh programs, while providing a user-friendly interface. (Sound’s vaguely familiar, doesn’t it?) I’ve included some screenshots to satisfy the curiosity of casual visitors, and to whet the appetite of those who might install the operating system…

(http://www.aux-penelope.com/)

Magic number (programming) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Interesting list of “Magic Debug Values” from Wikipedia:

  • 0x..FACADE : Used by a number of RTOSes
  • 0xA5A5A5A5 : Used in embedded development because the alternating bit pattern (10100101) creates an easily recognized pattern on oscilloscopes and logic analyzers.
  • 0xABABABAB : Used by Microsoft‘s HeapAlloc() to mark “no man’s land” guard bytes after allocated heap memory
  • 0xABADBABE : Used by Apple as the “Boot Zero Block” magic number
  • 0xABADCAFE : A startup to this value to initialize all free memory to catch errant pointers
  • 0xBAADF00D : Used by Microsoft‘s LocalAlloc(LMEM_FIXED) to mark uninitialised allocated heap memory
  • 0xBADBADBADBAD : Burroughs large systems “uninitialized” memory (48-bit words)
  • 0xBADCAB1E : Error Code returned to the Microsoft eVC debugger when connection is severed to the debugger
  • 0xBADC0FFEE0DDF00D : Used on IBM RS/6000 64-bit systems to indicate uninitialized CPU registers
  • 0xBADDCAFE : On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks uninitialised kernel memory (KMEM_UNINITIALIZED_PATTERN)
  • 0xBEEFCACE : Used by Microsoft .NET as a magic number in resource files
  • 0xC0DEDBAD : A memory leak tracking tool which it will change the MMU tables so that all references to address zero
  • 0xCAFEBABE : Used by both Mach-O (“Fat binary” in both 68k and PowerPC) to identify object files and the Java programming language to identify .class files
  • 0xCAFEFEED : Used by Sun MicrosystemsSolaris debugging kernel to mark kmemfree() memory
  • 0xCEFAEDFE : Seen in Intel Mach-O binaries on Apple Computer‘s Mac OS X platform (see 0xFEEDFACE below)
  • 0xCCCCCCCC : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging runtime library to mark uninitialised stack memory
  • 0xCDCDCDCD : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging runtime library to mark uninitialised heap memory
  • 0xDDDDDDDD : Used by MicroQuill’s SmartHeap and Microsoft’s C++ debugging heap to mark freed heap memory
  • 0xDEADBABE : Used at the start of Silicon GraphicsIRIX arena files
  • 0xDEADBEEF : Famously used on IBM systems such as the RS/6000, also used in the original Mac OS operating systems, OPENSTEP Enterprise, and the Commodore Amiga. On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks freed kernel memory (KMEM_FREE_PATTERN)
  • 0xDEADDEAD : A Microsoft Windows STOP Error code used when the user manually initiates the crash.
  • 0xDEADF00D : All the newly allocated memory which is not explicitly cleared when it is munged
  • 0xEBEBEBEB : From MicroQuill’s SmartHeap
  • 0xFADEDEAD : Comes at the end to identify every OSA script
  • 0xFDFDFDFD : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging heap to mark “no man’s land” guard bytes before and after allocated heap memory
  • 0xFEEDFACE : Seen in PowerPC Mach-O binaries on Apple Computer‘s Mac OS X platform. On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks the red zone (KMEM_REDZONE_PATTERN)
  • 0xFEEEFEEE : Used by Microsoft‘s HeapFree() to mark freed heap memory
  • 0xFEE1DEAD : Used by Linux reboot() syscall

via Magic number (programming) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

I have no idea if The Manga Guide to Databases will be any good (the publisher sez, “In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.”) but I sure hope it’s the start of a trend. I want a manga guide to supersymmetry, the surplus labor theory of value, tensor calculus and many other elusive concepts.

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing