Copy/Move Files Faster In Windows Vista

I found these programs on the interwebs last week and thought they might be useful; the first, TeraCopy, significantly sped up my file transfer speed in Windows Vista and seems a lot more intelligent than the built-in Windows Explorer copy/move dialog. The other nice thing about TeraCopy is that it seamlessly replaces the original Explorer dialog, so all you have to do to use it is just drag and drop (or Cut/Copy and Paste with the menu or keyboard shortcuts) like you usually would.

The second, Direct Folders, improves the File Open/Save dialog and adds a shortcut menu to any folder in Explorer.

  1. TeraCopy (http://www.codesector.com/teracopy.php)
    Copies files faster and smarter than Windows Explorer’s built-in copy function (this program replaces it) – asks you questions at the *beginning* of the copy operation instead of getting halfway through, then asking if you want to overwrite something.

  2. Direct Folders (http://www.codesector.com/directfolders.php)
    Makes it easier to navigate to a specified set of folders – gives you a shortcut list by double-clicking on the desktop, or the blank space in any Explorer folder window.

Lifehacker: Copy and Paste Without Switching Windows

Here’s a great tip from Lifehacker about how to set up an AutoHotkey script to copy/paste without manually switching windows:

I have one very simple AutoHotkey script which I use when I need to do some massive copying and pasting work, which simplifies the task into just one keystroke: Win+C.

With this script, I run Notepad (or any program to paste the content into), browse through some web sites, select text or pictures, and hit Win+C to capture the content—without leaving my browser. The script switches to the destination program (Notepad or otherwise), pastes the information, and returns me to my browser automatically. Check out the video for how it works. It’s good for transferring bits of data between two programs like compiling a list of email addresses. It’s also customizable—instead of entering a new line, it can move on to the next cell in the spreadsheet.

(via Copy and Paste Without Switching Windows)