Things I see in student code | FOB

My CS300 professor at Portland State University just wrote a fantastic blog post about things he commonly sees in student source code – it’s a great read and helpful for reflecting on your own code and best practices:

I’ve read quite a lot of student code over the years. Some of it is quite good. A lot of it is full of predictable badnesses. These notes attempt to enumerate some of this badness, so that you may avoid it.

This is pretty C-centric in its current form. However, many of its lessons are multilingual. This is a living document, so don’t expect it to be the same next time you look at it. In particular, the numbering may change if something gets inserted in the middle. It is revisioned automatically by Drupal, so feel free to point at a particular revision if you care.

 

via Things I see in student code | FOB.

the hamstu » The Typography of Code

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Cool post with a lot of great history and font samples!

As a self proclaimed programmer/designer I enjoy not only the logical and practical things in life, but also the beautiful and well designed. And I find the greatest pleasure when these things converge to produce something extraordinary.One such thing is Typography. Typography is the art of language, the visualization of the spoken word. A medium by which non-verbal communication is made possible. And though I profess no expertise in this art, I have come to deeply appreciate it’s power and ability to convey the same message in so many different ways. Each with a unique feeling and style.

The Messenger

In 1956 Howard Kettler designed the typeface Courier. It was made for IBM’s new (and revolutionary) line of electric typewriters. Originally called “Messenger”, Courier is one of the earliest fixed-pitch (also known as Monospace) fonts, meaning each character takes up the same amount of space on a line; allowing for easy tabular alignment and legibility.

Courier was a hit, and as many made the transition from typewriter to computer, this classic typeface wasn’t far behind. It was included in all early Apple computers, and while creating the core fonts for Windows 3.1, Microsoft hired Monotype Typography to give Courier a makeover. And so Courier New was born, as a thinner and cleaner version of it’s former self.

via the hamstu » The Typography of Code.

Best T-SQL Ever! (The T-SQL Mandelbrot)

This is just pure awesome, from a geek standpoint. Thanks to The Daily WTF and Graeme Job for sharing this wonderful little jewel of code and making my day just a bit more interesting. 😉

Here’s the quote from The Daily WTF:

“So I was bored at work one day,” Graeme Job explains, “and wondered, what’s the most useless thing I could do with my time without actually doing anything. Then it hit me. I could use T-SQL to generate… Mandelbrot.”

Graeme continued, “Following is a single T-SQL SELECT statement that generates a text-representation of a Mandelbrot Set. The results are best viewed in text-mode.”

You can grab the code from The Daily WTF, and run it via SQL Server Management Studio. Of course, I tried it myself, and got this result:

2008-11-20_113348

(via http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Stupid-Coding-Tricks-The-TSQL-Madlebrot.aspx)