Engadget: Canon EOS 5D Mark II firmware update cures ‘black dot’ ailment

Excellent news! (And one of the reasons I’m glad I got off the early-adopter bandwagon…)

Those equipped with the Canon EOS 5D Mark II might’ve noticed a few continuity errors between their shots and real life, such as light from a building window missing its right side. The company has released firmware update 1.0.7 to eradicate this “black dot” phenomenon — which can affect any point light source — as well as fix a problem with vertical banding noise that appears when recording in sRAW1 format. Hit up the read link for patch instructions. You can go now resume your regularly-scheduled Mark II lovefest.

via Canon EOS 5D Mark II firmware update cures ‘black dot’ ailment – Engadget.

From the Canon site that has the firmware:

What has changed in Firmware Version 1.0.7?

It improves and mitigates the following image quality phenomena.

  1. “Black dot” phenomenon (the right side of point light sources becomes black)
  2. When shooting night scenes, the right side of point light sources (such as lights from building windows) may become black. The phenomenon may become visible if the images are enlarged to 100% or greater on a monitor or if extremely large prints of the images are made. This firmware improves and mitigates this phenomenon.

  3. Vertical banding noise

    If the recording format is set to sRAW1, vertical banding noise may become visible depending on the camera settings, subject, and background. The firmware improves and mitigates this phenomenon.

And, if you’re not yet familiar with the issues that this firmware fixes:

  1. Black Dots from Hell: Is the 5D Mark II Fucked?
  2. 5D Mark II Banding Problem – Why has the lord forsaken us?

Photojojo » Polaroid: R.I.P. in 14 Days :(

Awww… =P

Well gang, we fought the good fight, but it’s official: Polaroid isn’t making any more film after December 31st, 2008.

Sad though we are, we’ve found a few bits of good news scattered amid the wreckage.

via Photojojo » Polaroid: R.I.P. in 14 Days😦.

(P.S. You should really check out the Polapremium site they mentioned. Very cool stuff.)

Making a Pinhole Lens for SLR Cameras

Pretty cool little guide from CameraHacker.com

Ever since I started learning about photography, I have been fascinated with the art of pinhole photography. I always thought that the possibility of creating an image using the tiniest hole is amazing. If you are unfamiliar with pin-hole photography, see my related links section; I have added some links about pinhole photography for your wandering minds.

Despite my fascination, I have never involved myself with pinhole photography. I read about how to make a pinhole camera out of a 35mm film container. Although the process of making the camera is easy, loading and processing the film is extremely cumbersome. In fact, to use it, one frame of film has to be loaded in the dark, exposure has to be calculated, picture has to be exposed by uncovering the pinhole, pinhole has to be covered, and film has to be unloaded in the dark. All that work for a single exposed frame. But that is not the end, because the frame will have to be processed a personal darkroom, since it is extremely hard to find a place to process 35mm films one frame at a time.

I have always thought, “wouldn’t it be nice if I can have a pin-hole camera that has built-in exposure meter, uses 35mm film roll, and comes with auto film winder?” Then I can concentrate on creating pinhole art, instead of concentrating on the processing of creating pinhole art. After a few years (yes I am a tad slow) I thought, “wouldn’t it be nice if I can have a pin-hole lens on my EOS camera that has auto-exposure, uses standard 35mm film, and has automatic film winder.” Wow!

via Making a Pinhole Lens for SLR Cameras.

(You can pick up the whole book at Amazon here)

JSTN – Please, Canon

He’s got an excellent point – I’d love if I could set up my camera the way he’s described…

Please, Canon

Let me set my own lower limit for shutter speed with auto ISO.

I want to shoot wide open, but 1-divided-by-focal-length is just too slow for me most the time. At 24mm it frustratingly picks 1/20th even with several usable ISO stops that could go towards a faster shutter speed.

Shutter priority mode does me no good; I can’t rely on it to choose the maximum aperture (in fact, it rarely does).

Manual mode doesn’t support auto ISO. If you have it selected and you switch to manual it forces the ISO to 400. Instead, I wish it let me lock a shutter speed and aperture and then float the ISO as needed. Hitting the floor would cause the shutter speed to drop, but not before.

Actually, what I really want is a modeless UI that lets me set any two of the three (shutter, aperture, ISO) and institute my own graceful degradation.

Camera interface designs up until now have relied on the assumption that you’re only making two exposure decisions per shot (shutter speed and aperture, ISO being decided beforehand when you load the film). Digital suddenly adds a third thing to think about and the interfaces haven’t caught up yet.

via JSTN – Please, Canon.

Canon Dial 35 – Camerapedia.org

Fascinating camera from the 1960’s…

The Canon Dial 35 was an unconventional half-frame 35mm camera with clockwork automatic film advance. It was made in Japan by Canon from November 1963. The Dial 35 was also sold as the Bell & Howell Dial 35.

The body had an unusual “portrait” format rectangular shape, with a short, wide-diameter lens barrel containing the CdS meter photocells window around the 28mm lens. Rotating the lens barrel set the speed of the Seikosha shutter; the aperture was set automatically. A button below the viewfinder could be pulled out to give manual aperture control, for manual exposure settings or flash. Film speed was set on a scale around the meter window.

Focus was set on a lever around the top of the lens barrel, with a display inside the viewfinder.

There was a cylindrical handle at the bottom, which also wound the clockwork mechanism. On the (users) left is an accessory shoe. The film ran vertically, from the cassette at the top to the take-up spool at the bottom, giving a landscape-format 24x18mm frame when the camera is upright.

Dial 35-2

The 35-2 has a black nameplate at the top in place of the engraved name and a longer-lasting clockwork motor. Speed range is increased to 1000ASA, the meter uses a different battery and a hot shoe is added.

via Canon Dial 35 – Camerapedia.org.

More info here: http://web.comhem.se/~u87754955/canon-dial-35.html

(If you’re in search of the original manual, you can find it here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/2570932/Canon-Dial-352-manual)

Quality control sticker? (PASSED)


I’ve always wondered what that sticker meant…

Hiro Matsu , Aug 09, 2006; 08:17 a.m.

Anyone recognize this sticker? Thanks.

James Lai , Aug 09, 2006; 08:44 a.m.

Yes, it is a quality control sticker from the Japan Camera Inspection Institute. The JCII was set up by the Japanese government and camera industry to ensure the quality of camera equipment exported from Japan. I don’t think they’ve put those stickers on cameras for several years now, and in the later years there were plenty of knock-off stickers floating around.

via Quality control sticker? – Photo.net Nikon Forum