ASP.NET: Starter Kits and Community Projects

In relation to the last post, here are some starter kits and projects officially listed at Microsoft’s own ASP.NET site (http://www.asp.net/community/projects/)

Starter Kits

 

DotNetNuke® Web Application Starter Kit

DotNetNuke is an open source web application framework ideal for creating, deploying and managing interactive web, intranet and extranet sites. The combination of an enterprise portal, built-in content management system, elegant skinning engine, and the ability to display static and dynamic content makes DotNetNuke an essential tool for ASP.NET developers.

TheBeerHouse: CMS and E-commerce Starter Kit

TheBeerHouse starter kit enables you to implement a website with functionality typically associated with a CMS/e-commerce site. This website demonstrates key features of ASP.NET 2.0 and is the sample used in the book, “ASP.NET 2.0 Website Programming / Problem – Design – Solution.”

Small Business Starter Kit

The Small Business Starter Kit provides a sample of a business promotion website suitable for small and medium-sized businesses. It provides a template for customizing and creating a site for your own business out-of-the-box, with advanced features including integration with SQL and XML data sources for content and data management.

Open Source

dasBlog

dasBlog is a blogging engine that offers elegant visual aesthetics, powerful easy to use features, and a unique application architecture. dasBlog requires no database engine, using file-based content management with an architecture that ensures excellent performance.

Visit the dasBlog Web Site

ScrewTurn Wiki

ScrewTurn Wiki is a fast, powerful and simple ASP.NET wiki engine, installs in a matter of minutes and it’s available in different packages, fitting every need. It’s even free and open source.

Visit the ScrewTurn Wiki Web Site

BlogFodder: List Of Free / Open Source ASP.NET Web Applications

I started looking for free/open-source ASP.NET applications to run on my development instance of IIS (since IIS is already running on my machine), and stumbled upon this list today:

As a big ASP.NET advocate, I’m loving the recent surge in open source / free ASP.NET applications that are hitting the web – And what’s more because Microsoft have given us some great building foundations with the frameworks like the ASP.NET Membership Provider, a lot of these open source programs are very high quality!  More so than some of the paid applications.

I thought it would be a good idea to create an ever growing list of all the open source ASP.NET applications I could find – Obviously I haven’t had chance to download or install every application so I can’t vouch for them

Notable applications:

Full list available at:
http://www.blogfodder.co.uk/post/2008/07/List-Of-Free–Open-Source-ASPNET-Web-Applications.aspx)

[C#] Open webform in new browser window from C# codebehind page

Found a great little snip of code online today from csharphelp.com about how to open a new browser window from a C# codebehind:

Response.Write("<SCRIPT language=javascript>var w=window.open('Rpt_OrderStatus_Form.aspx','OrderStatus','height=800,width=800');</SCRIPT>");

…but, one of the comments on that thread is that the Response.Write disrupts the page appearance. Any thoughts/suggestions on a better way to open a new browser window from a C# codebehind?

[g++] warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’

Just stumbled on to this problem/fix while writing some C++ code for my CS courses…

warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’

I hadn’t really thought about this much, as previous versions of g++ (such as the 3.4.3 version we’re using on our university systems) never complained about this issue, but g++ 4.2.3 does. The fix, as I found from multiple posts around the web, is to change all function arguments that will be expected to take a string constant from “char *” to “const char *”. For example:

Function Call:

class.someFunction("");

Original Function Prototype:

void class::someFunction(char *);

Updated Function Prototype:

void class::someFunction(const char *);

I’m somewhat new to C++ (OSU taught Java and I code in C# for the day job), so please give me a bit of slack on this one if you’re a seasoned pro. 😉

As always, comments and questions are welcome via my comment box. Thanks for reading!

Regarding Base-64: Trying to solve an ASP.NET issue…

Update: Thanks to WordPress.com automagically linking related posts to each other, I think I may have found a potential solution to this issue here: Invalid character in a Base-64 string (ASP.NET)

The problem seems to be with the ViewState. The ViewState is encrypted, and when an attempt is made to decrypt it on postback, the error is triggered.  The solution is actually quite simple: in the web.config file, set the ViewState not to be encrypted, like this:

<system.web>
<pages viewStateEncryptionMode=”Never”>
</pages>
</system.web>

You should really check out the rest of that article; it looks like it’s got a great explanation for what is actually occurring.

Also, this seems to be related to another message, “Invalid Viewstate.”

My original article is below the fold…

Continue reading “Regarding Base-64: Trying to solve an ASP.NET issue…”

Null-Coalescing Operator

While at a rather disappointing MSDN event yesterday, I came across one gem of C# 3.0 candy in the form of a null-coalescing operator. This is basically a short-cut for the oft seen:

string emailAddress = parsedValue != null ? parsedValue : “(Not provided)”;

OR

string emailAddress = String.Empty;
if (parsedValue != null) {
emailAddress = parsedValue;
}
else {
emailAddress = “(Not provided)”;
}

Using the Null-Coalescing Operator
These can now instead be re-written using the new null-coalescing operator as:

string emailAddress = parsedValue ?? “(Not provided)”;

This can roughly be read as “Set emailAddress equal to parsedValue unless it is null, in which case set it to the literal (Not Provided)”.

(via Null-Coalescing Operator)

Stroustrup and Sutter: C++ to run and run | Reg Developer

This is the conference (and super session) I attended last week. It was really cool. =)

Stroustrup and Sutter: C++ to run and run | Reg Developer

SD West 2008 For the second year in a row organizers at the Software Development Conference & Expo West felt the super sessions hosted by C++ legends Bjarne Stroustrup and Herb Sutter were worth some ink on the event agenda.

“There was a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s when they simply stopped advertising C++ sessions at this conference,” Sutter told attendees. “And yet they found a curious thing: every year for four years, C++ was the strongest track at the show. With zero advertising! That says something about the market. That says that there are problems that C++ is solving.”

The duo offered the C++ crowd day-long sessions at SD West. In fact, a session presented last year (Concepts and generic programming in C++0x”) was back by popular demand, alongside an additional day of new material covering the design and evolution of the grandpappy of object-oriented programming languages.

Sutter is the author of several books on software development, a lead architect at Microsoft, chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, and coiner of the phrase “concurrency revolution.” Stroustrup is also an author, a professor of computer science at the Texas A&M University’s college of engineering, and a research fellow at AT&T Labs.

Of course, the Danish computer scientist is best known as the creator and original implementer of C++.

Stroustrup doesn’t like to hear his brainchild referred to as an object-oriented programming (OOP) language, though he allowed that its main contribution was to make OOP mainstream. “Before C++, 99.9 per cent of programmers never even heard of it OOP,” he said during a post-session Q&A. “Those who’d heard of it believed that it was only for slow graphics written by geniuses.”