dPS: 5 Ways To Never Lose Your Photos

Another excellent article from the digital Photography School blog about how to properly archive your photos.

The biggest nightmare of every photographer is the thought of catastrophic loss of their photographs. In the days of film, options were limited and often serious photographers would keep their negatives and slides in fire proof safes or bank safe deposit boxes. Even still several great photographers have had their work taken from them due to fire, water damage and even sub-grade storage supplies. Digital photography provides an additional level of complexity to photographers as they look to keep their photographic work safe. Now in addition to fire and water damage there is the risk of file corruption, failed drives and file format obsolescence. With increased risk comes the responsibility to be diligent in heading off such catastrophes with a solid backup plan. Below are 5 steps you can take to minimize risk of losing your digital photos.

1. Immediately back-up your photos to DVD after off loading them to your computer from your compact flash cards

Here is where procrastination can get the better of you. I have known several people who have accidentally deleted files from their compact flash cards before backing their photos up or deleted files from their computer with out having a backup. These days it’s not too hard to find a deal on a 100 disc spool of DVDs. Have one on hand and take the extra 15 minutes to burn a disc.

(continue reading via 5 Ways To Never Lose Your Photos)

Flickr Batch Download Tools

It surprises me that good flickr batch downloading tools are so hard to find! I’ve been on a kick lately, per suggestions from flickr advice articles, to archive and remove my point-and-shoot shots from my flickr photostream so that I can focus on my more artistic work.

To this end, I’ve been looking for a good tool to download my old photos, and have found three good candidates:

1. FlickrEdit (Java)

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From the looks of this application, it *should* be the one-stop shop for all of your flickr downloading needs, but for some reason, it consistently failed on my machine. After about twenty failed attempts, I gave up. Hopefully this is just a small bug, but I got dissuaded from using it very quickly. Nonetheless, it looks like a solid app, and it’s probably worth a look. (Please let me know if it works for you, and which version of Java you have installed – I can’t figure out what was wrong with it.)

2. Flump (Adobe AIR)

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Flump is a super lightweight, no-nonsense photo downloading tool. You just give it an account, a location to download, and a file mask. It will download all of the photos from that account. The downside? It will *only* download all the photos from that account. If you’re trying to only back up a selection of your flickr stream, you’ll have to wait until the downloading sequence gets that far. But, it’s still worth a look because it’s just that easy to use.

3. FlickrDown (Windows/.NET 2.0)

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FlickrDown is by far my favorite of the bunch. It’s super simple to use, gives you a great selection of your sets (and allows you to choose all your photos), and is quite solid. This is well worth the small download. Windows only, though. (Or, you might be able to rig it to run on Mono.)

Update: Just found this via Lifehacker: Flickr AutoDownloadr. Haven’t checked it out yet, but it looks promising.