Lifehacker: Learn to Play an Instrument Online

Another wonderful Lifehacker post, about how to learn to play an instrument online

…might be a chance for me to finally learn how to play that guitar… 😉

Chances are at one point or another, you’ve either purchased an instrument or considered doing so with the intention of learning to play it; most of us, however, never get around the learning part. The internet is a glorious fount of freely available information, and it’s slowly filling up with excellent tutorials for getting good at just about anything—including playing a new instrument. Hit the jump for a handful of great resources for getting started with a new instrument online for the low, low price of free.

(via Learn to Play an Instrument Online)

Slashdot: F/OSS Flat-File Database

Good question, actually. See the link for some answers from the /. community:

Leemeng writes “I’m looking for a simple, free, and F/OSS flat-file database program. I’m storing info about Wi-Fi access points that I come across, maybe 8-9 fields per entry. I’ve outgrown Notepad. This info is for my own reference only; it is not going on a Web server. Googling was unhelpful, with results skewed towards SQL, Access (MS), and Oracle, all of which would be overkill for my purposes. My criteria are: it must be simple, F/OSS, must work in Windows Vista, preferably use a portable format, must not be an online app, and must not require Java. Does such a beast exist?”

(via http://developers.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/05/20/2150246)

Lifehacker: Set Firefox 3 to Launch Gmail for mailto: Links

gmailhandler-header-win

Another great post from Lifehacker (of course) about how to set Gmail as your default mail handler in Firefox 3:

In today’s earlier list of five extensions you won’t need in Firefox 3, we said you won’t need any special toolbars, third-party apps, Greasemonkey scripts, or extensions to get Firefox to use webapps to open certain types of links. This means that when you click on an email address that uses the standard mailto: email protocol, Firefox 3 itself can launch Gmail instead of a desktop app. By default, the Firefox RC 1 only comes with Yahoo! Mail as a possible mailto: link handler, which leaves Gmail users out in the cold—unless you know how to set it up by hand. Here’s how to configure Firefox 3 to use Gmail as your default mailto: application handler.

Ready to set up Gmail? Roll up those sleeves.

(via Set Firefox 3 to Launch Gmail for mailto Links)

(jQuery plugin: Validation) Now *this* is the good stuff…

I’ve been playing around with this over the weekend and I’ve been *very* impressed:

jQuery plugin: Validation

Current version: 1.3
Compressed filesize: 14301 bytes
License: MIT/GPL

Files:

Download
Changelog
Demos
Documentation

(more info at http://bassistance.de/jquery-plugins/jquery-plugin-validation/)

@TheKeyboard: Form Validation with jQuery

Great article about jQuery Form Validation from littlehart.net:

Now that I have to actually design interfaces for other people, I am learning the finer details of Javascript. Specifically, I’m using JQuery as my library of choice. I won’t go into why I’m using, just go to the site and see it for yourself. One of the things I’ve had to build recently is a playlist editor for the IPTV project. I decided to be user-friendly for once, and make it Ajax-powered. So this meant a lot of work creating small little actions in my Zend Framework code to accept form posts, etc. Still cleaning things up, but I wanted to share some of the coolness from using a jQuery form plugin .

So, never having really done any Javascript form validation (I know you’re shocked) I unleashed my inner “programmer” to go and hack away at it so I can figure it out, then call back my inner “developer” to make the code elegant and compact. It took me all morning but I figured it out thanks to Google and just hacking away at it. One of the neat things about Javascript is that it supports the ability to dynamically define functions in your code. With it’s extensive use of callbacks, jQuery leverages this to the hilt. I believe this is what the Ruby crowd refers to as “blocks and closures”. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Okay, so here’s some code that illustrates how I was doing validation of the form:

(continued via Form Validation with jQuery)