My Archival Workflow…

In regard to the last post, “dPS: 5 Ways To Never Lose Your Photos“, I thought it would be good to share the workflow that has served me well for the past couple of years:

  1. Copy/move from CompactFlash

    The first step is pretty obvious, get your photos off the card! (Generally, I move them off the card at this point, but if I don’t have any available media for step 2, or the pictures are incredibly important, I’ll leave the originals on the card and switch to my backup card.)

  2. Backup to CD/DVD

    Now it’s time to backup to the first type of archival media – I use two 2gb CompactFlash cards, which lends well to being backed up on DVD if they’re both full (since a DVD typically holds 4.7gb of data on a single layer). If I haven’t taken a full 4gb of photos in a day, I’ll either wait until I have 4gb of photos to back up, or just back up to a CD.

  3. Copy to small external HD (120gb)

    First step in the department of redundancy department, use SyncToy to synchronize my recent photos to my external hard drive. I use SyncToy instead of merely copying the files because this ensures that any straggling data gets copied over to the external HD, and because it just makes the process simpler. No half-completed file transfers I have to dig through to figure out what did and didn’t get transferred – it will give me a report at the end.

    You can find SyncToy for download here: http://www.microsoft.com/prophoto/downloads/synctoybeta.aspx

  4. Copy from small (120gb) to large external HD (750gb)

    Second step in the department of redundancy department, similar to the step above, though this is a longer-term storage, and it only involves files that have already been archived to the 120gb drive, not directly downloaded to my computer from the CompactFlash card. The reason for this is, of course, redundancy and data integrity. Since this transfer happens less often than the transfer to the 120gb from my computer, there’s less likelyhood of data corruption, and I always try to verify (to the best of my ability) the integrity of the data I’m about to transfer to “cold storage”. I haven’t yet filled up this 750gb drive yet, but as soon as it gets close, I’ll look into getting a Drobo: http://www.drobo.com/Products/drobo.html

  5. Review past archived media (CD/DVD)

    Any type of data gets outdated at some point. Luckily, there are some basic photographic standards that have been pretty solid throughout the years (TIFF, JPEG, etc.), but it’s always worthwhile to look at old media, pictures or otherwise, and make sure that both the media is still in good condition and that the media is easily accessible by modern hardware/software.

That’s my process for now, and has worked for me for the past couple of years, as I mentioned above. Unfortunately, it took me some trial and error to find out this approach, and there were some photo casualties along the way. I’m still trying to dig up my old (pre-2003) photos, but multiple location moves and changes of hardware may have lost these older photos for good.

Remember, backup, backup, backup!

dPS: 5 Ways To Never Lose Your Photos

Another excellent article from the digital Photography School blog about how to properly archive your photos.

The biggest nightmare of every photographer is the thought of catastrophic loss of their photographs. In the days of film, options were limited and often serious photographers would keep their negatives and slides in fire proof safes or bank safe deposit boxes. Even still several great photographers have had their work taken from them due to fire, water damage and even sub-grade storage supplies. Digital photography provides an additional level of complexity to photographers as they look to keep their photographic work safe. Now in addition to fire and water damage there is the risk of file corruption, failed drives and file format obsolescence. With increased risk comes the responsibility to be diligent in heading off such catastrophes with a solid backup plan. Below are 5 steps you can take to minimize risk of losing your digital photos.

1. Immediately back-up your photos to DVD after off loading them to your computer from your compact flash cards

Here is where procrastination can get the better of you. I have known several people who have accidentally deleted files from their compact flash cards before backing their photos up or deleted files from their computer with out having a backup. These days it’s not too hard to find a deal on a 100 disc spool of DVDs. Have one on hand and take the extra 15 minutes to burn a disc.

(continue reading via 5 Ways To Never Lose Your Photos)

Portland Mercury: Court Of Appeals Upholds Cyclist’s Right To Carry Concealed Ninja Sword

Only in Portland… 😉

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The court has overturned the February conviction of a man for carrying a concealed ninja sword in a Critical Mass rally. According to the appeals opinion, James M.Turner was riding his bicycle in a Critical Mass rally, when a Portland Police Officer riding next to him saw “three to four inches” of a sword handle wedged between Turner’s back and his backpack. The officer testified in court that there was no doubt in his mind that the object was a “sword or [something] similar.”

According to the transcript, the officer asked Turner, “What’s sticking out of your neck?”

Turner replied that it was a “ninja sword,” and the officer motioned for him to pull over. After Turner stopped, the officer removed the sword, which was sheathed, from between Turner’s body and his backpack. As he removed it, he discovered the sword was contained in a “double sheath, where one sword goes in one end, one in the other.” At the time the officer removed the first sword, he had not seen and was not aware of the second sword. He arrested Turner for carrying a concealed weapon based on his discovery of the second sword.

The appeals court ruled, however, that the officer did not have probable cause to stop Turner for carrying a concealed second sword, based on their conversation about the first sword, which did not constitute an official “stop.” However, the interaction became an official “stop,” the court ruled, when the officer motioned to the rider to pull over.

(continue reading via Court Of Appeals Upholds Cyclist’s Right To Carry Concealed Ninja Sword)

DestroyFlickr

This is a super-slick Adobe AIR application which you can use to browse Flickr. Check out the screenshots below:

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As you can see, it’s a pretty slick application. And, since you might be interested, you can find the photo in the screenshot above here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gmhennessey/2757101923/

DestroyFlickr, on the other hand, can be found here:

http://www.destroytoday.com/?p=Project&id=DestroyFlickr

I must say, it’s well worth the small download and simple install. Very slick. 🙂

Grand Theft Auto 4 – Vehicle Swingset Glitch Tutorial

YouTube – Grand Theft Auto 4 – Vehicle Swingset Glitch Tutorial.

Much clearer explanation, from the video’s page:

This is a fast and simple vehicle swingset tutorial.

Follow my steps in the video, so you know how to do the swingset glitch.

The steps are also in the video description on Youtube.

This works on both the PS3 and Xbox 360 as of now.
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This is the location of where the swingset glitch is.
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This can be done by any vehicle, but it is hard to do this glitch with a motorcycle because there are high chances of you falling off.

You have to go slow onto the swingset with your car.
Once you reach the middle bar, hold X (PS3) or the brake button.
While holding the brake button, hold R2 (PS3) or the accelerate button.
It sometimes works without holding R2.

After a few seconds you will be catapulted across the map.

Canon E18 Error (Lens Problem)

Update!
I’ve fixed the E18 Error on my PowerShot SD450 and posted the steps here:
E18 Error Fixed! (Canon PowerShot SD450)


Found this site when I began to research the error which mysteriously began appearing on my Canon PowerShot SD450 (and luckily *not* on my Canon 30D), which explains what seems to be a pretty prevalent error within the PowerShot series:

This web site’s mission is to provide a source of information and help for the Canon E18 Error.

The E18 seems to be a significant flaw in an otherwise great camera.
It is a flaw well know by users of Canon Powershot and Ixus cameras and is currently not acknowledged by Canon as a flaw in camera design.

HOW IT ALL WORKS:
Canon E18 error happens when the lens gets stuck while trying to extend. The camera will beep a few times and the LCD will display a little E18 in the lower-left corner. The lens gets stuck in the extended position, and refuses to move either to focus the lens or to retract when powered off.

Apparently, people who posted about this incident on forums say they had to send the camera for repair and that Canon has horrible customer support and response time.

Here is how the E18 error looks like. You just get a black screen with small “E18” sign in the lower-left corner:

The problem usually happens because dirt or sand get into the lens mechanism. But it seems that more and more people are showing, who took great care of their camera, and still started receiving E18 errors.

(via www.e18error.com)