Magic number (programming) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Interesting list of “Magic Debug Values” from Wikipedia:

  • 0x..FACADE : Used by a number of RTOSes
  • 0xA5A5A5A5 : Used in embedded development because the alternating bit pattern (10100101) creates an easily recognized pattern on oscilloscopes and logic analyzers.
  • 0xABABABAB : Used by Microsoft‘s HeapAlloc() to mark “no man’s land” guard bytes after allocated heap memory
  • 0xABADBABE : Used by Apple as the “Boot Zero Block” magic number
  • 0xABADCAFE : A startup to this value to initialize all free memory to catch errant pointers
  • 0xBAADF00D : Used by Microsoft‘s LocalAlloc(LMEM_FIXED) to mark uninitialised allocated heap memory
  • 0xBADBADBADBAD : Burroughs large systems “uninitialized” memory (48-bit words)
  • 0xBADCAB1E : Error Code returned to the Microsoft eVC debugger when connection is severed to the debugger
  • 0xBADC0FFEE0DDF00D : Used on IBM RS/6000 64-bit systems to indicate uninitialized CPU registers
  • 0xBADDCAFE : On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks uninitialised kernel memory (KMEM_UNINITIALIZED_PATTERN)
  • 0xBEEFCACE : Used by Microsoft .NET as a magic number in resource files
  • 0xC0DEDBAD : A memory leak tracking tool which it will change the MMU tables so that all references to address zero
  • 0xCAFEBABE : Used by both Mach-O (“Fat binary” in both 68k and PowerPC) to identify object files and the Java programming language to identify .class files
  • 0xCAFEFEED : Used by Sun MicrosystemsSolaris debugging kernel to mark kmemfree() memory
  • 0xCEFAEDFE : Seen in Intel Mach-O binaries on Apple Computer‘s Mac OS X platform (see 0xFEEDFACE below)
  • 0xCCCCCCCC : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging runtime library to mark uninitialised stack memory
  • 0xCDCDCDCD : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging runtime library to mark uninitialised heap memory
  • 0xDDDDDDDD : Used by MicroQuill’s SmartHeap and Microsoft’s C++ debugging heap to mark freed heap memory
  • 0xDEADBABE : Used at the start of Silicon GraphicsIRIX arena files
  • 0xDEADBEEF : Famously used on IBM systems such as the RS/6000, also used in the original Mac OS operating systems, OPENSTEP Enterprise, and the Commodore Amiga. On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks freed kernel memory (KMEM_FREE_PATTERN)
  • 0xDEADDEAD : A Microsoft Windows STOP Error code used when the user manually initiates the crash.
  • 0xDEADF00D : All the newly allocated memory which is not explicitly cleared when it is munged
  • 0xEBEBEBEB : From MicroQuill’s SmartHeap
  • 0xFADEDEAD : Comes at the end to identify every OSA script
  • 0xFDFDFDFD : Used by Microsoft‘s C++ debugging heap to mark “no man’s land” guard bytes before and after allocated heap memory
  • 0xFEEDFACE : Seen in PowerPC Mach-O binaries on Apple Computer‘s Mac OS X platform. On Sun MicrosystemsSolaris, marks the red zone (KMEM_REDZONE_PATTERN)
  • 0xFEEEFEEE : Used by Microsoft‘s HeapFree() to mark freed heap memory
  • 0xFEE1DEAD : Used by Linux reboot() syscall

via Magic number (programming) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BobAtkins.com: Manual focus lenses on Canon EOS bodies

Manual Focus Lens on Canon EOS DSLR
Photojojo: Manual Focus Lens on Canon EOS DSLR

I found this excellent post below from BobAtkins.com about using manual focus lenses on Canon EOS bodies via this great article at Photojojo: Better Lenses for Less Money: How To Use Vintage Lenses with Your DSLR

Using Manual Focus Lenses on Canon EOS bodies

A common question is whether older manual focus lenses from other manufacturers can be used with a Canon EOS body. The answer is a qualified “yes” in many cases. Of course you don’t get autofocus, nor do you get any sort of focus confirmation. Also, you don’t get any sort of automatic iris operation. In most SLRs, focusing is done at full aperture, and if you stop the lens down to, say, f11, it remains fully open until just before exposure, then it stops down for the exposure and opens up again. This gives a brighter viewfinder image and makes focusing easier and more accurate. When these lenses are mounted on an EOS body, stop down metering must be used. That means that the lens is first focused at full aperture (for maximum accuracy), then manually stopped down to the shooting aperture before the shot is taken. Some people have trouble accurately focusing using the standard EOS viewfinder screen, since it has no focus aids (like a split image center). While some of the higher end models (like the EOS-1 series, the EOS 3 and the EOS A2), so have additional accessory screens with focus aids (e.g. screen Ec-B has a split image center), the consumer level cameras (Rebel, Elan, digital Rebel, 10D, 20D) do not.

Clearly using a manual focus lens is inconvenient, but sometimes it can be worth it if the equivalent EOS lens is expensive, if the manual focus lens is better than any Canon EF or EF-S series lens (rare, but it happens), if you shoot mostly static subjects or if you don’t use the lens very often.

via Canon EOS lens Adapters – Manual focus lenses on Canon EOS bodies

Windows Embedded Visual Style for XP

In case you’re looking for something fresh (and it’s signed by Microsoft, so you won’t need to hack anything to make it work)…

clip_image002

Windows XP users have not really seen a lot of love theme-wise from Microsoft since the release of the operating system. A measly handful of official themes have been released by Microsoft and the trend seems to continue for Windows Vista users. There is not really a reason to not to supply customers with fresh themes for their operating systems. If you look on the Internet you find many resources that cater to the needs of users who want to change the default themes.

Official themes on the other hand have the advantage of being signed meaning that there is no need to tamper with the uxtheme.dll file that protects the operating system from unofficial themes. Vishal over at Ask VG discovered a new signed Windows XP theme that is also compatible with Windows Server 2003 that can be installed without changing system files.

He discovered the theme in the Windows Embedded Standard CTP Refresh distribution and provided download links to it. The theme is supplied as a self extracting executable that installs the theme in the right location in Windows. The theme can then be selected from the Themes tab in the Display Properties.

(via ghacks.net)

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

I have no idea if The Manga Guide to Databases will be any good (the publisher sez, “In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.”) but I sure hope it’s the start of a trend. I want a manga guide to supersymmetry, the surplus labor theory of value, tensor calculus and many other elusive concepts.

Manga guide to databases – Boing Boing

Dock Icons Galore!

I’ve been using RocketDock for quite some time, and I’m always on the hunt for great looking dock icons compatible with it (Or MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher, Y’z Dock, etc.). Luckily, I’ve stumbled across some pretty sweet picks lately and thought I’d share. 🙂

folders

Refresh_CL_Icon_Pack_by_TPDKCasimir

Sleek_XP__Software_by_deleket

You can find a whole bunch more great icons at the following links:

Instant Eyedropper

This little tool is awesome. It’s like the eyedropper in Photoshop, except that it works on any pixel of your screen and gives you the hex code for the color in your clipboard. Very cool!

How it works

  1. Move the mouse pointer to the Instant Eyedropper icon in the system tray.

    Step One

  2. Press and hold the left mouse button and move the mouse pointer to the pixel whose color you want to identify.

    Step One

  3. Release the mouse button.

That’s it. The clipboard now contains the color code – in HTML format (or any other format that you have previously specified). It can be pasted and used in any text or HTML editor or the Color Picker tool of Photoshop.

(http://instant-eyedropper.com/)